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Dopamine-related receptors, substance dependence, behavioral problems and personality among juvenile delinquents
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4505-5668
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2021 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 169, article id 109849Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective was two-fold: to examine possible associations between dopamine-related genetic polymorphisms and (1) substance dependence; and (2) self-reported psychiatric disturbances, behavioral problems, and personality. Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP: s) in COMT, DAT and DRD4 was conducted in 174 Russian male juvenile inmates (14–18 years of age) subdivided into having a diagnosis of substance dependence or not, as assessed by using K-SADS-PL. The inmates completed several self-reports assessing psychiatric symptoms (CPTS-RI, BDI), behavioral problems (YSR), and personality traits (TCI). Results revealed that juveniles meeting the criteria for substance dependence differed significantly from their counterparts in four polymorphisms, namely COMT rs737865, DAT rs6347, DRD4 C_1611535 and DRD4 exon III; and exact binary regression analysis indicated a highly significant association between the DRD4 C_1611535 GG genotype and substance dependence. One-way ANOVA tests further showed this gene polymorphism variant to be significantly associated with higher levels of posttraumatic stress, thought problems, aggressive behavior, and personality traits indicating antisocial personality disturbances, as compared with the other gene polymorphism variants. In conclusion, the results underscore the role of the DRD4 polymorphism C_1611535 GG genotype for substance dependence, and suggest its associations with different self-reported phenotype characteristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021. Vol. 169, article id 109849
Keywords [en]
dopamine, substance dependence, behavioral problems, personality, juvenile delinquents
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Research subject
Public Health Sciences; Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-187936DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2020.109849ISI: 000600676300013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-187936DiVA, id: diva2:1510831
Available from: 2020-12-17 Created: 2020-12-17 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved

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Ruchkin, VladislavKoposov, RomanOreland, Larsaf Klinteberg, BrittGrigorenko, Elena L.

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Personality and Individual Differences
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyPsychology

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