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What will studies of Fulani individuals naturally exposed to malaria teach us about protective immunity to malaria?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2804-0325
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. CEITEC Masaryk University, Czech Republic.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Public Health Agency of Sweden, Sweden.
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Number of Authors: 52020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 92, no 4, article id e12932Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are an estimated over 200 million yearly cases of malaria worldwide. Despite concerted international effort to combat the disease, it still causes approximately half a million deaths every year, the majority of which are young children with Plasmodium falciparum infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Successes are largely attributed to malaria prevention strategies, such as insecticide-treated mosquito nets and indoor spraying, as well as improved access to existing treatments. One important hurdle to new approaches for the treatment and prevention of malaria is our limited understanding of the biology of Plasmodium infection and its complex interaction with the immune system of its human host. Therefore, the elimination of malaria in Africa not only relies on existing tools to reduce malaria burden, but also requires fundamental research to develop innovative approaches. Here, we summarize our discoveries from investigations of ethnic groups of West Africa who have different susceptibility to malaria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 92, no 4, article id e12932
Keywords [en]
B cells, dendritic cells, inflammation, macrophages, monocytes, parasitic, T cells
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-187673DOI: 10.1111/sji.12932ISI: 000576528300014PubMedID: 32652609OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-187673DiVA, id: diva2:1512092
Available from: 2020-12-21 Created: 2020-12-21 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Troye-Blomberg, MaritaQuin, JaclynBujila, IoanaÖstlund Farrants, Ann-Kristin

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