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The formation of planetary systems with SPICA
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Number of Authors: 402021 (English)In: Publications Astronomical Society of Australia, ISSN 1323-3580, E-ISSN 1448-6083, Vol. 38, article id e055Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this era of spatially resolved observations of planet-forming disks with Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and large groundbased telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT), Keck, and Subaru, we still lack statistically relevant information on the quantity and composition of the material that is building the planets, such as the total disk gas mass, the ice content of dust, and the state of water in planetesimals. SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) is an infrared space mission concept developed jointly by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and European Space Agency (ESA) to address these questions. The key unique capabilities of SPICA that enable this research are (1) the wide spectral coverage 10-220 mu m, (2) the high line detection sensitivity of (1-2) x10(-19)Wm(-2) with R similar to 2 000-5 000 in the far-IR (SAFARI), and 10-20Wm(-2) with R similar to 29 000 in themid-IR (SPICA Mid-infrared Instrument (SMI), spectrally resolving line profiles), (3) the high far-IR continuum sensitivity of 0.45mJy (SAFARI), and (4) the observing efficiency for point source surveys. This paper details how mid- to far-IR infrared spectra will be unique in measuring the gas masses and water/ice content of disks and how these quantities evolve during the planet-forming period. These observations will clarify the crucial transition when disks exhaust their primordial gas and further planet formation requires secondary gas produced from planetesimals. The high spectral resolution mid-IR is also unique for determining the location of the snowline dividing the rocky and icy mass reservoirs within the disk and how the divide evolves during the build-up of planetary systems. Infrared spectroscopy (mid- to far-IR) of key solid-state bands is crucial for assessing whether extensive radial mixing, which is part of our Solar System history, is a general process occurring in most planetary systems and whether extrasolar planetesimals are similar to our Solar System comets/asteroids. We demonstrate that the SPICA mission concept would allow us to achieve the above ambitious science goals through large surveys of several hundred disks within similar to 2.5 months of observing time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021. Vol. 38, article id e055
Keywords [en]
comets: general, infrared: planetary systems, Kuiper belt: general, minor planets, asteroids: general, protoplanetary disks
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-200125DOI: 10.1017/pasa.2021.31ISI: 000721318200001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-200125DiVA, id: diva2:1623149
Available from: 2021-12-28 Created: 2021-12-28 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, Bengt

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