Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The role of music in the English language classroom: A qualitative study of teachers' beliefs and practices in Swedish schools
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
2021 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Music has been used as a teaching approach in ELT for a long time and the rapid accessibility to music has enabled both teachers and students to use it more. The positive effects of music on language learning are many; however, the use of music in the English language classroom is still debated. Although there are many previous studies about the use of music for language learning, to improve vocabulary for example, there are few studies regarding teachers’ beliefs and practices in relation to the use of music in the English classroom. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the role music has in the English language classroom and this will be done by examining teachers’ beliefs and practices of using music to improve English vocabulary learning. The research questions for the present study are as follows: 1. What are the differences between upper secondary and lower secondary school teachers in regards to their beliefs and practices of using music in the EFL classroom? 2. How do teachers incorporate music as a teaching unit in the EFL classroom? 3. What are the beliefs of teachers regarding the effects of music on English vocabulary learning? The study was carried out through semi-structured interviews with four teachers: two upper secondary and two lower secondary school teachers. The chosen analysis for the study was thematic analysis as it is best suited for transcriptions. The results of the study showed that there are no big differences in teachers’ beliefs and practices. They all believe that music has positive effects on students’ vocabulary learning. The upper secondary school teachers believe that there are many materials of music whereas the lower secondary school teachers believe that music presents new things such as new words for example. Moreover, most of the teachers believe that music increases motivation, interest, and attention. In addition, although the teachers believe that music can be used for all skills, they mainly use it for listening and writing exercises. However, the upper secondary school teachers focus more on the writing skill while the lower secondary school teachers focus more on the listening skill. The teachers use music in many ways such as word gap exercises, interpreting/writing lyrics, guessing lyrics, and as aids in discussions about history. In general, the teachers believe that music has positive effects on vocabulary learning as it engages the students in repetition of words, and enables them to analyse and translate lyrics, to encounter new words and to explain them.

 

Keywords:

Music, teachers’ beliefs, teachers’ practices, EFL, vocabulary learning.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021.
Keywords [en]
Music, teachers' beliefs, teachers' practices, EFL, vocabulary learning
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Specific Languages
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-201212OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-201212DiVA, id: diva2:1630860
Available from: 2022-01-21 Created: 2022-01-21 Last updated: 2022-01-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

By organisation
Department of English
General Language Studies and LinguisticsSpecific Languages

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 505 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf