Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Psychosocial workplace factors and alcohol-related morbidity: a prospective study of 3 million Swedish workers
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6156-3964
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 52022 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 366-371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Psychosocial workplace factors may be associated with alcohol-related morbidity, but previous studies have had limited opportunities to take non-occupational explanatory factors into account. The aim of this study is to investigate associations between job control, job demands and their combination (job strain) and diagnosed alcohol-related morbidity while accounting for several potentially confounding factors measured across the life-course, including education. Methods: Job control, job demands and job strain were measured using the Swedish job exposure matrix measuring psychosocial workload on the occupational level linked to over 3 million individuals based on their occupational titles in 2005 and followed up until 2016. Cox regression models were built to estimate associations with alcohol-related diagnoses recorded in patient registers. Results: Low job control was associated with an increased risk of alcohol-related morbidity, while high job demands tended to be associated with a decreased risk. Passive and high-strain jobs among men and passive jobs among women were also associated with an increased risk of alcohol diagnoses. However, all associations were found to be weakened in models adjusted for other factors measured prospectively over the life-course, especially in models that included level of education. Conclusion: The associations between low job control and high job demands, and the risk of alcohol-related morbidity reflect underlying socioeconomic differences to some extent. Lower job control, however, remained associated with a higher risk of alcohol-related morbidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2022. Vol. 32, no 3, p. 366-371
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-203138DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckac019ISI: 000762945600001PubMedID: 35234891Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85131269465OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-203138DiVA, id: diva2:1646604
Available from: 2022-03-23 Created: 2022-03-23 Last updated: 2022-08-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Hemmingsson, Tomas

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hemmingsson, Tomas
By organisation
Department of Public Health Sciences
In the same journal
European Journal of Public Health
Occupational Health and Environmental Health

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 17 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf