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Bioavailability of inhaled or ingested PFOA adsorbed to house dust
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science. Örebro University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3403-093x
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Number of Authors: 52022 (English)In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 29, no 52, p. 78698-78710Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Indoor environments may impact human health due to chemical pollutants in the indoor air and house dust. This study aimed at comparing the bioavailability and distribution of PFOA following both an inhalation and an oral exposure to PFOA coated house dust in rats. In addition, extractable organofluorine (EOF) was measured in different tissue samples to assess any potential influence of other organofluorine compounds in the experimental house dust. Blood samples were collected at sequential time points after exposure and at the time of termination; the lungs, liver, and kidney were collected for quantification of PFOA and EOF. The concentration of PFOA in plasma increased rapidly in both exposure groups attaining a Cmax at 3 h post exposure. The Cmax following inhalation was four times higher compared to oral exposures. At 48 h post exposure, the levels of PFOA in the plasma, liver, and kidney were twice as high from inhalation exposures. This shows that PFOA is readily bioavailable and has a rapid systemic distribution following an inhalation or oral exposure to house dust coated with PFOA. The proportion of PFOA to EOF corresponded to 65–71% and 74–87% in plasma and tissues, respectively. The mass balance between EOF and target PFOA indicates that there might be other unknown PFAS precursor and/or fluorinated compounds that co-existed in the house dust sample that can have accumulated in rats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2022. Vol. 29, no 52, p. 78698-78710
Keywords [en]
Perfluorooctanoic acid, Household dust, Ingestion, Gastro intestinal (GI), Airways, Adsorption, PFAS
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-207241DOI: 10.1007/s11356-022-20829-3ISI: 000810862400002PubMedID: 35699877Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85131782439OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-207241DiVA, id: diva2:1682574
Available from: 2022-07-11 Created: 2022-07-11 Last updated: 2022-10-27Bibliographically approved

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Bergman, Åke

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