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The Implication of Physically Demanding and Hazardous Work on Retirement Timing
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7740-4634
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8433-2405
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8806-5698
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 13, article id 8123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The need to retain individuals longer in the workforce is acknowledged in many high-income countries. The present study therefore aimed to examine the importance of physically demanding work tasks (PDWT) and physically hazardous work environment (PHWE) in relation to retirement timing among pensionable workers (≥61 years). A particular question was whether PDWT and PHWE increased in importance with age. Six waves (2008–2018) of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) were used (n = 5201; 56% women and 44% men; mean age at first survey was 61.0 (SD 2.0) years). Discrete time-event history analysis, stratified by socioeconomic position and gender, showed that among blue-collar workers, PDWT and PHWE were associated with an increased likelihood of retiring within the next two years. With increasing age, high-level PHWE was associated with higher probability of retiring among blue-collar men, whereas heavy PDWT was associated with lower probability of retiring among blue-collar women. Among white-collar workers, having at least some PDWT compared to no PDWT was associated with a lower likelihood of retiring within the next two years. With increasing age, exposure to PHWE was associated with higher probability of retiring among white-collar women. These results suggest that to delay retirements, organizations could offer their older employees, especially blue-collar workers and the oldest white-collar women, alternatives to PDWT and PHWE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2022. Vol. 19, no 13, article id 8123
Keywords [en]
physical job demands, physically demanding work tasks, physically hazardous work environment, retirement timing, actual retirement, age interactions
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-207649DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19138123ISI: 000825610500001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85133136946OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-207649DiVA, id: diva2:1685283
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01120Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1758Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2005-0734Swedish Research Council, 2009-06192Swedish Research Council, 2013-01645Swedish Research Council, 2015-06013Swedish Research Council, 2017-00624Available from: 2022-08-02 Created: 2022-08-02 Last updated: 2022-08-19Bibliographically approved

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Stengård, JohannaLeineweber, ConstanzeWesterlund, HugoWang, Hui-Xin

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Stengård, JohannaLeineweber, ConstanzeWesterlund, HugoWang, Hui-Xin
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