Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Elite Communities and Polarization in Neoliberal Society: Consecration in Australia's and Sweden's Wealthy Neighbourhoods
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4725-8757
Number of Authors: 22023 (English)In: Critical Sociology, ISSN 0896-9205, E-ISSN 1569-1632, Vol. 49, no 4-5, p. 767-782Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

'Elite communities' are the areas where the wealthy, and even 'superrich', live, socialize and raise their children as future economic and financial elites; they are the places where a few lead socially and economically privileged lives. Earlier studies have concentrated on the inner dynamics of these settings, focusing on the way residents are constructed and socialized as elites through their social, communicative and aesthetic abilities that are perceived as exemplary in contemporary neoliberal society. In this paper, we broaden the perspective, by exploring how these areas contribute to polarization, that is, how they generate distinctions based on money, morals and manners that are peculiar to neoliberalism's idealization of 'entrepreneurship', 'self-management', 'leadership' and the pursuit of an 'active lifestyle'. Our data come from two major ethnographic studies: one conducted between 2010 and 2015 of Sweden's wealthiest community, Djursholm, that is populated by the country's business and financial elites; the other conducted between 2016 and 2019 of three of Australia's most prestigious and economically privileged suburbs, Toorak (Melbourne), Mosman (Sydney) and Cottesloe (Perth).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2023. Vol. 49, no 4-5, p. 767-782
Keywords [en]
elites, neoliberalism, polarization, consecration, cultural capital
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-208212DOI: 10.1177/08969205221108656ISI: 000821650400001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85133888178OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-208212DiVA, id: diva2:1690465
Available from: 2022-08-26 Created: 2022-08-26 Last updated: 2023-06-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Holmqvist, Mikael

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Holmqvist, Mikael
By organisation
Stockholm Business School
In the same journal
Critical Sociology
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 65 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf