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Floristic Legacies of Historical Land Use in Swedish Boreo-Nemoral Forests: A Review of Evidence and a Case Study on Chimaphila umbellata and Moneses uniflora
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7580-5135
Number of Authors: 12022 (English)In: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 13, no 10, article id 1715Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many forests throughout the world contain legacies of former human impacts and management. This study reviews evidence of floristic legacies in the understory of Swedish boreo-nemoral forests, and presents a case study on two currently declining forest plants, suggested to have been favored by historical use of forests. The review provides evidence of forest remnant populations of 34 grassland species. Thus, many floristic legacies have their main occurrence in semi-natural grasslands, but maintain remnant populations in forests, in some cases more than 100 years after grazing and mowing management have ceased. Despite less information on true forest understory plants appearing as legacies of historical human use of boreo-nemoral forests, a putative guild of such species is suggested. The case study on two species, Chimaphila umbellata and Moneses uniflora (Pyroleae, Ericaceae) suggests that both species are currently declining, mainly due to modern forestry and ceased livestock grazing in forests. Chimaphila maintains remnant populations during decades, due to its extensive clonal capacity and its long-lived ramets. Moneses is more sensitive, due to a lower stature, weaker clonal capacity and short-lived ramets, flowering only once during their lifetime. Thus, Moneses have more transient occurrences, and will decline rapidly under deteriorating conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2022. Vol. 13, no 10, article id 1715
Keywords [en]
historical land use, forest biodiversity, livestock grazing, partial mycoheterotrophs, remnant populations
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-211610DOI: 10.3390/f13101715ISI: 000875923400001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85140781824OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-211610DiVA, id: diva2:1713153
Available from: 2022-11-24 Created: 2022-11-24 Last updated: 2022-11-28Bibliographically approved

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Eriksson, Ove

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