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Social Health and Cognitive Change in Old Age: Role of Brain Reserve
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2209-5699
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7283-750x
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Number of Authors: 102023 (English)In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 844-855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Individual aspects of social health (SH; eg, network, engagement, support) have been linked to cognitive health. However, their combined effect and the role of the structural properties of the brain (brain reserve [BR]) remain unclear. We investigated the interplay of SH and BR on cognitive change in older adults.

Methods: Within the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care–Kungsholmen, 368 dementia-free adults aged ≥60 years with baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging were followed over 12 years to assess cognitive change. A measure of global cognition was computed at each of the 5 waves of assessment by averaging domain-specific Z scores for episodic memory, perceptual speed, semantic memory, and letter and category fluency. An SH composite score was computed at baseline by combining leisure activities and social network. BR was proxied by total brain tissue volume (TBTV). Linear mixed models (adjusted for sociodemographic, vascular, and genetic factors) were used to estimate cognitive trajectories in relation to SH and TBTV. Interaction analysis and stratification were used to examine the interplay between SH and TBTV.

Results: Moderate–good SH (n = 245; vs poor, β-slope = 0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.002–0.02, p = 0.018) and moderate-to-large TBTV (n = 245; vs small, β-slope = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.02–0.04, p < 0.001) were separately associated with slower cognitive decline. In stratified analysis, moderate–good SH was associated with higher cognitive levels (but not change) only in participants with moderate-to-large TBTV (β-intercept = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.06–0.37, p < 0.01; interaction SH * TBTV, p < 0.05).

Interpretation: Our findings highlight the interplay between SH and BR that likely unfolds throughout the entire life course to shape old-age cognitive outcomes. ANN NEUROL 2023

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023. Vol. 93, no 4, p. 844-855
Keywords [en]
social health, cognitive change, old age, brain reserve
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215286DOI: 10.1002/ana.26591ISI: 000917173300001PubMedID: 36579809Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85147039620OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-215286DiVA, id: diva2:1745538
Note

SNAC-K (http://www.snac.org) is financially supported by the Swedish Ministry of Health and Social Affairs; participating county councils and municipalities; the Swedish Research Council; and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare. This project is part of the SHARED Consortium (https://www.shared-dementia.eu/), an EU Joint Program–Neurodegenerative Disease Research (JPND; www.jpnd.eu) project (grant no. 733051082). A.M. and A.-K.W. lead the Swedish stream of the SHARED Consortium and are funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (FORTE grant no. 2018-01888). J.M. and P.P. are part of the UK-led stream of the JPND consortium and are funded by the Alzheimer's Society (grant no. 469) in the UK. S.D. acknowledges support from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (FORTE grant no. 2019-01076).

Available from: 2023-03-23 Created: 2023-03-23 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved

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Kalpouzos, GrégoriaLaukka, Erika J.Wang, Hui-XinBäckman, LarsWelmer, Anna-KarinDekhtyar, Serhiy

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Marseglia, AnnaKalpouzos, GrégoriaLaukka, Erika J.Maddock, JaneWang, Hui-XinBäckman, LarsWelmer, Anna-KarinDekhtyar, Serhiy
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Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)Stress Research InstituteBiological psychology
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