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Depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment: A 10-year follow-up study from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5051-4929
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2021 (English)In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 64, no 1, article id e55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment often coexisted in the elderly. This study investigates the effect of late-life depressive symptoms on risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

Methods. A total of 14,231 dementia- and MCI free participants aged 60+ from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe were followed-up for 10 years to detect incident MCI. MCI was defined as 1.5 standard deviation (SD) below the mean of the standardized global cognition score. Depressive symptoms were assessed by a 12-item Europe-depression scale (EURO-D). Severity of depressive symptoms was grouped as: no/minimal (score 0–3), moderate (score 4–5), and severe (score 6–12). Significant depressive symptoms (SDSs) were defined as EURO-D score ≥ 4.

Results. During an average of 8.2 (SD = 2.4)-year follow-up, 1,352 (9.50%) incident MCI cases were identified. SDSs were related to higher MCI risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.26, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.10–1.44) in total population, individuals aged 70+ (HR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.14–1.61) and women (HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.08–1.51) in Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for confounders. In addition, there was a dose–response association between the severity of depressive symptoms and MCI incidence in total population, people aged ≥70 years and women (p-trend <0.001).

Conclusions. Significant depressive symptoms were associated with higher incidence of MCI in a dose–response fashion, especially among people aged 70+ years and women. Treating depressive symptoms targeting older population and women may be effective in preventing MCI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021. Vol. 64, no 1, article id e55
Keywords [en]
Depressive symptoms, dose–response, late-life, mild cognitive impairment
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Neurosciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-216425DOI: 10.1192/j.eurpsy.2021.2230PubMedID: 34446123Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85114342264OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-216425DiVA, id: diva2:1750494
Available from: 2023-04-13 Created: 2023-04-13 Last updated: 2023-04-13Bibliographically approved

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Wang, Hui-XinPei, Jin-Jing

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