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A global analysis of potential self-sufficiency and diversity displays diverse supply risks
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8756-1649
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3608-2426
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2621-378x
Number of Authors: 42023 (English)In: Global Food Security, ISSN 2211-9124, Vol. 37, article id 100673Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

International trade plays a fundamental role in today's globalized food system, however, trade-related disruptions to national food supply have become increasingly prevalent. Although national food self-sufficiency and the resilience of domestic food production are both increasingly discussed, they are rarely investigated in tandem. This hinders our understanding of the diversity of risks to national food supply. In this article we investigate the contribution of production to these risks, through the compilation of a comprehensive national production dataset and a multi-indicator assessment of self-sufficiency and diversity. Our results show that most of the world (127 countries and territories, 87% of the global population) achieves high levels of potential self-sufficiency (≥6 nutrients fulfilled), however only 33% of the world population (41 countries) are fully self-sufficient. Of countries with high levels of self-sufficiency, fruit and vegetable production (a proxy for many micronutrients) is the most common “missing” sufficiency. 66 countries (6% of population) have a low degree of self-sufficiency, highlighting potential vulnerability to trade-related disruptions. The relationship between sufficiency and diversity is not homogeneous, highlighting that some production systems are reliant on very few products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2023. Vol. 37, article id 100673
Keywords [en]
Food production, Self-sufficiency, Diversity, Risk, Resilience
National Category
Other Agricultural Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-216882DOI: 10.1016/j.gfs.2023.100673ISI: 000959452800001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85150458759OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-216882DiVA, id: diva2:1756948
Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Sustainability Risk: A social-ecological systems perspective
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainability Risk: A social-ecological systems perspective
2024 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Today’s world is characterised by new levels of complexity; however our societies remain deeply embedded in and dependent on a functioning biosphere. A biosphere that is increasingly being degraded by human activities. In this complex and intertwined world, acute shocks as well as chronic pressures of unsustainable activities have therefore become a prevalent feature. Together these shocks and chronic pressures create a complex risk landscape that we need to navigate with inter- and transdisciplinary solutions. However, the study of risk and the risk assessment tools in use, are siloed into scholarly disciplines and mismatched with the complexity at hand. In this thesis I tackle this mismatch, by using a social-ecological systems perspective and a variety of methodological approaches. Together the four papers of the thesis develop the interdisciplinary concept of sustainability risk and start to operationalise it through the application to national food systems and corporate sustainability risk assessment. Paper I introduces the concept of sustainability risk that I use and develop through-out the thesis. The paper also summarises some of the key definitions of risk within different disciplines and proposes five key dimensions that need to be adapted and developed in order for the existing risk assessment methods to fully capture risks in a complex world. Papers II-IV all represent applications of the concept of sustainability risk to different contexts. Paper II addresses national food supply risks and highlights how diverse risks to national self-sufficiency can come from low self-sufficiency (resulting in risk from trade disruptions) and low production diversity (resulting in risk from production shocks). Paper III addresses the data limitations we encounter when attempting to assess corporate sustainability risk and aims to overcome some of these limitations by developing fifteen novel reporting variables. These variables also contribute to the ongoing efforts to standardise corporate sustainability reporting. Paper IV builds on Paper III and develops an initial framework for assessing the risks to long-term natural resource production emanating from the impacts of corporate activities, thus broadening the conceptualisation of what risk is and how we assess it in the corporate sphere. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 2024. p. 51
Keywords
Sustainability risk, systemic risk, complex systems, social-ecological systems, corporate sustainability reporting, food security, resilience
National Category
Environmental Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Sustainability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-228761 (URN)978-91-8014-815-3 (ISBN)978-91-8014-816-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2024-06-14, hörsal 4, hus 2, Albano, Albanovägen 18 and online via Zoom, public link is available at the department website, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2024-05-22 Created: 2024-04-25 Last updated: 2024-05-13Bibliographically approved

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Wassénius, EmmyNyström, MagnusSøgaard Jørgensen, Peter

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