Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Development of Gambling Behaviour and Its Relationship with Perceived Social Support: A Longitudinal Study of Young Adult Male Gamblers
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut Für Therapieforschung, Germany; Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7282-0217
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 62024 (English)In: Journal of Gambling Studies, ISSN 1050-5350, E-ISSN 1573-3602, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 307-332Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Young adult men who gamble frequently face an elevated risk of developing gambling-related problems. So far, little is known about how changing levels of perceived social support interact with the course of gambling behaviour and gambling-related problems in this population. Using data from a prospective single-arm cohort study (Munich Leisure Time Study), we applied hierarchical linear models to investigate the longitudinal association of changes in perceived emotional and social support (hereafter PESS; operationalized as ENRICHD Social Support Instrument score) with gambling intensity, gambling frequency, and fulfilled criteria for gambling disorder. Pooling data from three time points (baseline, 12-month and 24-month follow-ups) to assess two 1-year intervals, these models disentangle the associations of (a) “level of PESS” (cross-sectional, between participants) and (b) “changes in individual PESS” (longitudinally, within-participants). Among the 169 study participants, higher levels of PESS were associated with fewer gambling-related problems (− 0.12 criteria met; p = 0.014). Furthermore, increasing individual PESS was associated with lower gambling frequency (− 0.25 gambling days; p = 0.060) and intensity (− 0.11 gambling hours; p = 0.006), and fewer gambling-related problems (− 0.19 problems; p < 0.001). The results suggest a mitigating influence of PESS on gambling behaviour and gambling-related problems. Increasing individual PESS appears more decisive for this pathway than high initial levels of PESS. Treatment and prevention strategies that activate and reinforce beneficial social resources in people with gambling-related problems are recommended and promising.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2024. Vol. 40, no 1, p. 307-332
Keywords [en]
Gambling disorder, Social support, Longitudinal study, Young adults
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-217134DOI: 10.1007/s10899-023-10200-7ISI: 000969764000001PubMedID: 37058216Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85152969346OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-217134DiVA, id: diva2:1756959
Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2024-04-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Kraus, Ludwig

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kraus, Ludwig
By organisation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD)
In the same journal
Journal of Gambling Studies
Substance Abuse

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 41 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf