Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Changes in co-use of alcohol and cannabis among Nordic adolescents in the 21st century: Results from the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs study
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 102024 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 616-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: In the 21st century, there has been a decline in alcohol use among adolescents in most Nordic countries, while trends of cannabis use have diverged. We explore how alcohol and cannabis use, respectively, and co-use of the two substances, have changed among Nordic adolescents. Three hypotheses are used to frame the study: (i) cannabis use has substituted alcohol use; (ii) there has been a parallel decline in both substances; and/or (iii) there has been a ‘hardening’ of users, implying that alcohol users increasingly use cannabis.

Methods: Data from the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs, conducted among 15- to 16-year-olds in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden (N = 74,700, 49% boys), were used to explore trends of past-year alcohol and cannabis use in the period 2003–2019.

Results: The proportion of adolescents reporting alcohol use decreased significantly in all Nordic countries except Denmark. The proportion of those using cannabis only was low (0.0%–0.7%) and stable in all countries. The total number of substance use occasions declined among all adolescents in all countries but Denmark. Among alcohol users, cannabis use became increasingly prevalent in all countries but Denmark.

Discussion and Conclusions: We found no support for the ‘parallel decline hypothesis' in alcohol and cannabis use among Nordic adolescents. Partially in line with the ‘substitution hypothesis’, cannabis use accounted for an increasing proportion of all substance use occasions. Our results suggests that the co-use of alcohol and cannabis has become more common, thus also providing support to the ‘hardening’ hypothesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2024. Vol. 43, no 3, p. 616-624
Keywords [en]
alcohol use, cannabis use, co-use, Nordic countries, time trends
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220202DOI: 10.1111/dar.13672ISI: 000976801500001PubMedID: 37095643Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85153630391OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-220202DiVA, id: diva2:1792067
Available from: 2023-08-28 Created: 2023-08-28 Last updated: 2024-04-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Svensson, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Svensson, JohanThor, Siri
By organisation
Department of Public Health SciencesStockholm University
In the same journal
Drug and Alcohol Review
Substance Abuse

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 23 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf