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Brown adipose tissue: can it keep us slim? A discussion of the evidence for and against the existence of diet-induced thermogenesis in mice and men
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2070-1587
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6594-2363
Number of Authors: 32023 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 378, no 1888, article id 20220220Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The issue under discussion here is whether a decrease in the degree of UCP1 activity (and brown adipose tissue activity in general) could be a cause of obesity in humans. This possibility principally requires the existence of the phenomenon of diet-induced thermogenesis. Obesity could be a consequence of a reduced functionality of diet-induced thermogenesis. Experiments in mice indicate that diet-induced thermogenesis exists and is dependent on the presence of UCP1 and thus of brown adipose tissue activity. Accordingly, many (but not all) experiments indicate that in the absence of UCP1, mice become obese. Whether similar mechanisms exist in humans is still unknown. A series of studies have indicated a correlation between obesity and low brown adipose tissue activity, but it may be so that the obesity itself may influence the estimates of brown adipose tissue activity (generally glucose uptake), partly explaining the relationship. Estimates of brown adipose tissue catabolizing activity would seem to indicate that it may possess a capacity sufficient to help maintain body weight, and obesity would thus be aggravated in its absence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2023. Vol. 378, no 1888, article id 20220220
Keywords [en]
diet-induced thermogenesis, UCP1, brown adipose tissue
National Category
Physiology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-222198DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2022.0220ISI: 001062424100013PubMedID: 37661736Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85169651199OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-222198DiVA, id: diva2:1805363
Available from: 2023-10-17 Created: 2023-10-17 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Nedergaard, Janvon Essen, GabriellaCannon, Barbara

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