Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Association between a mediterranean lifestyle and Type 2 diabetes incidence: a prospective UK biobank study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain; CIBERESP (CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health), Spain.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9401-9869
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 72023 (English)In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 22, article id 271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background There is mounting evidence that the Mediterranean diet prevents type 2 diabetes, but little is known about the role of Mediterranean lifestyles other than diet and among non-Mediterranean populations. This work aimed to examine the association between a comprehensive Mediterranean-type lifestyle and type 2 diabetes incidence in a British adult population.

Methods We used data from 112,493 individuals free of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged 40–69 years, from the UK Biobank cohort, who were followed from 2009 to 2010 to 2021. The Mediterranean lifestyle was assessed through the 25-item MEDLIFE index, which comprises three blocks: (a) “Mediterranean food consumption”, (b) “Mediterranean dietary habits”, (c) “Physical activity, rest, social habits, and conviviality”. Diabetes incidence was obtained from clinical records. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to analyze associations and adjusted for the main potential confounders.

Results After a median follow-up of 9.4 years, 2,724 cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained. Compared to the first quartile of MEDLIFE adherence, the hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for increasing quartiles of adherence were 0.90 (0.82–0.99), 0.80 (0.72–0.89) and 0.70 (0.62–0.79) (p-trend < 0.001). All three blocks of MEDLIFE were independently associated with lower risk of diabetes.

Conclusions Higher adherence to the MEDLIFE index was associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in the UK Biobank. A Mediterranean-type lifestyle, culturally adapted to non-Mediterranean populations, could help prevent diabetes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2023. Vol. 22, article id 271
Keywords [en]
Adult-onset diabetes, Cohort, Diet, Lifestyle medicine, Physical activity, Prevention
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223000DOI: 10.1186/s12933-023-01999-xISI: 001081948100002PubMedID: 37794451Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85173162122OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-223000DiVA, id: diva2:1807494
Available from: 2023-10-26 Created: 2023-10-26 Last updated: 2023-10-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Carballo-Casla, Adrián

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Carballo-Casla, Adrián
By organisation
Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
In the same journal
Cardiovascular Diabetology
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyEndocrinology and Diabetes

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf