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The Good Behavior Game for students with special educational needs in mainstream education settings: A scoping review
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3892-2794
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4856-1830
Number of Authors: 32024 (English)In: Psychology in the schools (Print), ISSN 0033-3085, E-ISSN 1520-6807, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 861-886Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a classroom management strategy that consistently demonstrates its ability to promote positive behaviors and peer relations among students, with immediate and long-term benefits. This scoping review aimed to provide an overview of peer-reviewed research on the GBG specifically focused on students with special educational needs (SEN) in mainstream education settings. Following a systematic search-and-selection procedure, 30 studies were included, 26 with an experimental design and 4 with a qualitative/mixed-methods design. SEN participants were mainly subgroups of students with baseline assessments of emotional-behavioral difficulties; there was, however, substantial clinical and methodological heterogeneity across studies. Integrative findings from quantitative and qualitative studies indicate that the GBG benefits most students with SEN in mainstream settings, while results for students with severe socio-behavioral difficulties are ambiguous. We identified a paucity of research on students with neurodevelopmental diagnoses such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or autism spectrum disorder, as well as on the perspectives of students and teachers and challenges associated with the GBG for students with severe difficulties. Schools implementing the GBG should be aware that some students may need individual adaptations to participate in the GBG, and teachers may need support to implement these adaptations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2024. Vol. 61, no 3, p. 861-886
Keywords [en]
Good Behavior Game, scoping review, special educational needs
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223423DOI: 10.1002/pits.23086ISI: 001069632000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85171854068OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-223423DiVA, id: diva2:1809008
Available from: 2023-11-01 Created: 2023-11-01 Last updated: 2024-03-11Bibliographically approved

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Jornevald, MariaRoll-Pettersson, LiseHau, Hanna

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