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Support for policies restricting alcohol exposure in films: Does feeding back the amount of alcohol in films increase support?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5618-385x
Number of Authors: 42024 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 132-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Alcohol exposure is common in popular films, and research has demonstrated a link between alcohol exposure and use. The likelihood of implementing specific policies to reduce the amount of film exposure is dependent on the level of public support; however, evidence is currently lacking. This study investigated how supportive people are of film-related alcohol policies and whether providing information about the amount of film exposure increased support.

Methods: Australian adults (N = 252) first provided estimates of how much alcohol they thought were in popular films and then were randomised to either see an infographic about the amount of alcohol in films or not. All participants rated how supportive they were of eight policies.

Results: The items ‘alcoholic beverages and consumption should not be shown in G or PG rated films’ (M = 3.54) and ‘alcohol should not be glorified in films’ (M = 3.49) were rated significantly higher than the scale's midpoint of 3 (p < 0.001). Participants who were older, female or reported lower alcohol use were more supportive of the policies. Only one policy item, ‘information about alcohol sponsorship should be provided’ received higher support from those who received the infographic compared to those who did not (M = 3.53 vs. M = 3.05; t(250) = −3.09, p = 0.002).

Discussion and Conclusion: Participants were relatively supportive of film alcohol policies. However, providing information about the amount of alcohol in films did not make a difference on the level of support for most film alcohol policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2024. Vol. 43, no 1, p. 132-140
Keywords [en]
alcohol, alcohol policy, films, media
National Category
Substance Abuse Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223989DOI: 10.1111/dar.13756ISI: 001094795000001PubMedID: 37910434Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85175710264OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-223989DiVA, id: diva2:1814091
Available from: 2023-11-23 Created: 2023-11-23 Last updated: 2024-03-11Bibliographically approved

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