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Prolonging working life among blue-collar workers: The buffering effect of psychosocial job resources on the association between physically demanding and hazardous work and retirement timing
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7740-4634
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8433-2405
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5051-4929
Number of Authors: 32023 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 22, article id 101372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The need to delay retirement timing has been acknowledged in Western countries due to demographic ageing. The aim of the present study was to examine the buffering effects of job resources (decision authority, social support, work-time control, and rewards) on the association of exposures to physically demanding work tasks and physically hazardous work environment with non-disability retirement timing. Results from discrete-time event history analyses, in a sample of blue-collar workers (n = 1741; 2792 observations) from the nationwide longitudinal Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), supported that decision authority and social support may buffer the negative impact of heavy physical demands on working longer (continuing working vs retiring). Stratified analyses by gender showed that the buffering effect of decision authority remained statistically significant for men, while that of social support remained statistically significant for women. Moreover, an age effect was displayed, such that a buffering effect of social support on the association of heavy physical demands and high physical hazards with working longer were found among older men (≥64 years), but not younger (59–63 years). The findings suggest that heavy physical demands should be reduced, however, when not feasible physical demands should be accompanied by social support at work for delaying retirement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023. Vol. 22, article id 101372
Keywords [en]
retirement timing, physically demanding work tasks, physically hazardous work environment, job resources, moderator, interaction
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225010DOI: 10.1016/j.ssmph.2023.101372Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85149214471OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-225010DiVA, id: diva2:1824269
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) under Grant 2019–01120. Data collection was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) through the Stockholm Stress Center under Grant 2009–1758; the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare under Grant 2005–0734; and the Swedish Research Council (VR) under Grant 2009-06192, 2013–01645, 2015–06013, and 2017–00624.

Available from: 2024-01-04 Created: 2024-01-04 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved

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Stengård, JohannaLeineweber, ConstanzeWang, Hui-Xin

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