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Intelligence predicts better cognitive performance after normal sleep but larger vulnerability to sleep deprivation
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3083-7456
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7590-0826
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Number of Authors: 52023 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 32, no 4, article id e13815Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fluid intelligence is seen as a beneficial attribute, protecting against stress and ill-health. Whether intelligence provides resilience to the cognitive effects of insufficient sleep was tested in the current pre-registered experimental study. Participants (N = 182) completed the Raven's test (measuring fluid intelligence) and a normal night of sleep or a night of total sleep deprivation. Sleepiness and four cognitive tests were completed at 22:30 hours (baseline), and the following day after sleep manipulation. At baseline, higher fluid intelligence was associated with faster and more accurate arithmetic calculations, and better episodic memory, but not with spatial working memory, simple attention or sleepiness. Those with higher fluid intelligence were more, not less, impacted by sleep deprivation, evident for arithmetic ability, episodic memory and spatial working memory. We need to establish a more nuanced picture of the benefits of intelligence, where intelligence is not related to cognitive advantages in all situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023. Vol. 32, no 4, article id e13815
Keywords [en]
cognitive capacity, risk factor, stress
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225011DOI: 10.1111/jsr.13815ISI: 000905375200001PubMedID: 36579399Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85145298741OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-225011DiVA, id: diva2:1824283
Note

Research Funding: Karolinska Institutet; Nordic Mensa Fund; Riksbankens Jubileumsfond. Grant Number: 13-1159:1; Vetenskapsrådet. Grant Number: 421-2013-2083.

Available from: 2024-01-04 Created: 2024-01-04 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved

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Balter, Leonie J. T.Sundelin, TinaAxelsson, John

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