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The Economic Side of Social Relations:  Household Poverty, Adolescents' Own Resources and Peer Relations
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
2007 (engelsk)Inngår i: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 471-485Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

While sociological theory suggests that economic resources, through the social side of consumption, are important to social relations, few studies have investigated this relation empirically. The present article examines the relationship between adolescents’ (aged 10–18 years) economic resources and social relations with peers using interview data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey 2000 and from Statistics Sweden's Living Conditions Survey 2001–2003 (n = 5,388). Several indicators of economic resources and social relations reported by adolescents and their parents, as well as register data on household income, are used. The analyses show that economic resources, both in terms of household economy and adolescents’ own resources, are positively associated with social relations. Child poverty and relative deprivation appear to have sizeable effects on some dimensions of social relations. These results are robust for a number of controls of household characteristics and are valid across age groups and for both sexes. The analyses also suggest that the intra-household distribution of resources matters for adolescents’ social relations.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2007. Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 471-485
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-21440DOI: 10.1093/esr/jcm016ISI: 000250087200005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-21440DiVA, id: diva2:187967
Tilgjengelig fra: 2007-12-10 Laget: 2007-12-10 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-13bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Social Relations in Youth: Determinants and Consequences of Relations to Parents, Teachers, and Peers
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Social Relations in Youth: Determinants and Consequences of Relations to Parents, Teachers, and Peers
2011 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

The thesis includes three empirical studies on Swedish children’s well-being. Central themes in these studies are how children’s social relations are influenced by and influence other dimensions of their well-being. The studies are framed in the introductory chapter, which includes an international comparison of children’s social relations.

Study I analyses whether relations with parents and teachers are associated with the adolescent’s social background and whether the positive consequences of having strong relations are more important for disadvantaged adolescents. The results, based on nationally representa­tive survey data, confirm that strong social relations are conducive to adolescents’ school and psychological outcomes, and show that dis­advan­taged adolescents have weaker relations with parents and teachers. Furthermore, these results imply that relations with teachers are of particular importance for disadvantaged adolescents’ outcomes, while parental relations are equally important for both advantaged and dis­advantaged adolescents.

Study II investigates the social side of consumption by studying the association between adolescents’ economic resources and their relations with peers. Analyses on nationally representative survey data; which include children’s own responses, as well as information from parents and register data, show that economic resources, in terms of both house­hold economy and adolescents’ own resources, are positively associated with peer relations.

Study III analyses whether final grades in compulsory school are influenced by the sex composition in school classes. Analyses using register data show that boys’ grades are negatively affected by the share of girls in school classes in typical female school subjects. Girls’ grades are negatively affected by the share of boys with highly educated parents. The proposed explanation behind the results is that sex composition effects are due to negative social comparisons with the other sex.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Stockholm: The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI), Stockholm University, 2011. s. 54
Serie
Swedish Institute for Social Research, ISSN 0283-8222 ; 84
Emneord
children, adolescents, youth, social relations, family, peers, teachers, well-being, social background, sex, school, living conditions, Sweden
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
sociologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-56122 (URN)978-91-7447-268-4 (ISBN)
Disputas
2011-06-01, Hörsal 9, Hus D, Universitetsvägen 10 D, Stockholm, 11:00 (engelsk)
Opponent
Veileder
Merknad
At the time of the doctoral defense, the following paper was unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Submitted.Tilgjengelig fra: 2011-05-10 Laget: 2011-04-08 Sist oppdatert: 2011-05-10bibliografisk kontrollert

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Totalt: 211 treff
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