Endre søk
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Bees in a landscape context: what do bees need and who needs them?
Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Botaniska institutionen.ORCID-id: 0000-0002-3791-4688
2011 (engelsk)Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

The interaction between plant and pollinator is generally mutualistic. The plant becomes pollinated or gets its pollen grains dispersed and the pollinator gets food rewards consisting of nectar or pollen. Many plants and crops are dependent on pollinators for fruit set and must therefore have efficient pollinators in their surroundings. There are many groups of animals that include pollinating species; however, bees are often referred to as the most effective pollinating group. Their effectiveness is partly because of their dependence on floral food resources both for larval development and adult survival. In addition to high abundance, high diversity of bees has been shown to be important for effective and stable pollination services of crops and wild plants. The importance of identifying what is affecting the bee composition and distribution in a landscape is therefore obvious. In addition to food resources, bees need suitable nesting habitats for reproduction and often external substrates for the construction of brood cells. On Earth, there are bees on every continent except Antarctica and 17,500 species are so far identified (Michener 2007). Despite the high diversity of bees with great variation in food and nesting requirements one factor has been found to frequently explain the diversity of bees; heterogeneity. In general, on a regional scale, bee diversity increases with higher heterogeneity in the landscape. Highly heterogeneous environments, provides high diversity of food and nesting resources, which can support more species. However, bee communities will differ in their response to changes in the landscape depending on species composition, habitat and continent. Therefore knowledge about the bees’ basic ecology and life-history is important for interpreting results and planning conservation measures.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Stockholm: Department of Botany, Stockholm University , 2011. nr 4, s. 42
Serie
Plants & Ecology, ISSN 1651-9248 ; 2011:4
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-66372OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-66372DiVA, id: diva2:467641
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-01-10 Laget: 2011-12-19 Sist oppdatert: 2019-12-09bibliografisk kontrollert

Open Access i DiVA

fulltext(768 kB)412 nedlastinger
Filinformasjon
Fil FULLTEXT01.pdfFilstørrelse 768 kBChecksum SHA-512
393a399c5fe26107396b1d70468d438e16a28aac8f8bbca813ae8a6464d689602da98fa05b9b67a721b40137db7a648ca4e8a13662180894c3ab38091aedd232
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Søk i DiVA

Av forfatter/redaktør
Samnegård, Ulrika
Av organisasjonen

Søk utenfor DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Totalt: 412 nedlastinger
Antall nedlastinger er summen av alle nedlastinger av alle fulltekster. Det kan for eksempel være tidligere versjoner som er ikke lenger tilgjengelige

urn-nbn

Altmetric

urn-nbn
Totalt: 219 treff
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf