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Preceding non-linguistic stimuli affect categorisation of Swedish plosives
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9512-0739
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7658-9307
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1149-2517
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4269-5619
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2012 (English)In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 131, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Speech perception is highly context-dependent. Sounds preceding speech stimuli affect how listeners categorise the stimuli, regardless of whether the context consists of speech or non-speech. This effect is acoustically contrastive; a preceding context with high-frequency acoustic energy tends to skew categorisation towards speech sounds possessing lower-frequency acoustic energy and vice versa (Mann, 1980; Holt, Lotto, Kluender, 2000; Holt, 2005). Partially replicating Holt's study from 2005, the present study investigates the effect of non-linguistic contexts in different frequency bands on speech categorisation. Adult participants (n=15) were exposed to Swedish syllables from a speech continuum ranging from /da/ to /ga/ varying in the onset frequencies of the second and third formants in equal steps. Contexts preceding the speech stimuli consisted of sequences of sine tones distributed in different frequency bands: high, mid and low. Participants were asked to categorise the syllables as /da/ or /ga/. As hypothesised, high frequency contexts shift the category boundary towards /da/, while lower frequency contexts shift the boundary towards /ga/, compared to the mid frequency context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 131, no 4
Keywords [en]
Context effects, speech categorisation
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Phonetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-75970DOI: 10.1121/1.4708372OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-75970DiVA, id: diva2:530162
Conference
Acoustics 2012, Nantes, France, April 23-27, 2012
Available from: 2012-06-01 Created: 2012-05-07 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Bjerva, JohannesMarklund, EllenEngdahl, JohanTengstrand, LisaLacerda, Francisco
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