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Swedish Upper Secondary School Students' Conceptions of Negative Environmental Impact and Pricing
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik. Uppsala University, Sweden.ORCID-id: 0000-0001-6350-7763
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för de samhällsvetenskapliga ämnenas didaktik (CeSam). Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID-id: 0000-0002-8649-4632
2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, nr 3, s. 982-996Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores relationships between upper secondary school students. understanding of prices and environmental impacts. The study uses responses from 110 students to problems in which they were asked to explain differences in prices and also to express and justify opinions on what should be the difference in prices. Very few students expressed an environmental dimension in their understanding of price. A few students suggested that environmental impact influenced price by raising demand for Environmentally friendly products. A few students suggested that, environmentally friendly products. had higher prices because they were more costly to produce. We found no examples of students combining both lines of explanation. However, nearly half of the students believed that prices should reflect environmental effects, and this reasoning was divided between cases where the point was justified by a broad environmental motivation and cases where the point was justified in relation to incentives-to get consumers to act in a more environmentally friendly way.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
2013. Vol. 5, nr 3, s. 982-996
Nyckelord [en]
externalities, conceptions of price, conceptions of human and physical environment interactions
Nationell ämneskategori
Pedagogik
Forskningsämne
pedagogik
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-95096DOI: 10.3390/su5030982ISI: 000324047700009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-95096DiVA, id: diva2:658556
Forskningsfinansiär
Vetenskapsrådet
Anmärkning

AuthorCount:3;

Tillgänglig från: 2013-10-22 Skapad: 2013-10-21 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-12-12Bibliografiskt granskad
Ingår i avhandling
1. Exploring changes of conceptions, values and beliefs concerning the environment: A longitudinal study of upper secondary school students in business and economics education
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Exploring changes of conceptions, values and beliefs concerning the environment: A longitudinal study of upper secondary school students in business and economics education
2017 (Engelska)Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
Abstract [en]

This thesis examines students’ understanding of economic aspects of global environmental problems. The first aim is to identify and characterise changes in business and economics students’ conceptions of negative environmental effects and pricing goods and services. The second aim is to identify and characterise changes in students’ values, beliefs and personal norms regarding effective solutions to climate change problems. Three studies were carried out with students in Swedish upper secondary schools. The first study used an open-ended questionnaire and is presented in Article I. The second and third studies drew on a longitudinal study, using both qualitative and quantitative research methods and results are presented in Article II and Article III.

Article I shows that students’ awareness of environmental issues varies in relation to the type of good. Some goods are seen as more harmful to nature than others, for example, jeans were not perceived as environmentally negative while beef burgers and travel services were to some extent. This indicates that environmental references are often characterised through perceptible aspects of goods’ production i.e. being more expensive because of environmentally friendly production. Furthermore, some understanding of negative externalities was revealed. Interestingly, when value aspects of how prices should be set students more frequently refer to environmental impact.

Article II describes changes in students’ price and environmental conceptions over the course of a year. It identifies the fragmentary nature of students’ every-day thinking in relation to productivity, consumer preference and negative externalities. Differences in conceptions of how prices are linked to negative impact is characterised in terms of basic, partial and complex understandings of productivity as well as basic and partial understandings of consumers’ influences. Partial conceptions are seen as students’ conceptions in a process of change towards a more scientific understanding of price and negative environmental impact. Most interestingly, the results show that more than one aspect of environmental impact and pricing are simultaneously relevant. This is highlighted by a change from views putting productivity at the centre for how prices are set to include consumers’ preferences when judgmentally describing how prices should be set. The results conclude that students show a broader content knowledge regarding pricing and the environment when including normative preferences.

Article III explores changes in students’ value orientations, beliefs regarding efficient solutions to climate change and norms for pro-environmental actions. Small changes are observed regarding the three constructs. Value changes are reported in terms of a small average increase in importance of altruistic, biospheric and egoistic orientations while common individual changes are shown in shifts between weak and strong values. Beliefs regarding efficient climate change solutions are taxes and legislations while changes in market prices are perceived as being least effective. The findings show no direct relations between values and norms hence change in norms is associated with values through changes in beliefs.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Stockholm: Department of Education, Stockholm University, 2017
Serie
Doktorsavhandlingar från Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik ; 55
Nyckelord
environment, sustainability, interdisciplinary, longitudinal study, conceptual change, prices, externalities, values-beliefs-norms, climate change solutions, upper secondary school students, business and economics education
Nationell ämneskategori
Pedagogik
Forskningsämne
pedagogik
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147639 (URN)978-91-7797-018-7 (ISBN)978-91-7797-019-4 (ISBN)
Disputation
2017-12-01, Nordenskiöldsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 12, Stockholm, 10:00 (Engelska)
Opponent
Handledare
Forskningsfinansiär
Vetenskapsrådet, 2007-08877
Anmärkning

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following paper was unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Manuscript.

Tillgänglig från: 2017-11-08 Skapad: 2017-10-16 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-01-11Bibliografiskt granskad

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Av författaren/redaktören
Ignell, CarolineLundholm, Cecilia
Av organisationen
Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktikCentrum för de samhällsvetenskapliga ämnenas didaktik (CeSam)Stockholm Resilience Centre
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Sustainability
Pedagogik

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