Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Associations between EBV and CMV Seropositivity, Early Exposures, and Gut Microbiota in a Prospective Birth Cohort: A 10-Year Follow-up
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 8
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Pediatrics, ISSN 2296-2360, Vol. 4, 93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Early-life infections with persistent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are delayed in affluent countries, probably due to alterations in early environmental exposures, such as maternal age, siblings, and day-care attendance. We have previously reported that the timing of EBV and CMV contraction is related both to allergic sensitization and changes in functional competence of immune cells, while the presence/absence of lactobacilli [Lactobacillus (L.) casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus] or Staphylococcus (S.) aureus in feces is related to the risk for allergy. Here, we used the same prospective longitudinal birth cohort of children to investigate early-life environmental exposures and their influence on EBV and CMV contraction over time. Since gut microbes also belong to this category of early exposures, we investigated their association with herpesvirus contraction. Our results show that these two viruses are acquired with different kinetics and that EBV and CMV seroprevalence at 10 years of age was 47 and 57%, respectively. We also observed that a delayed EBV or CMV infection was associated with older maternal age [time ratio (TR) 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.21, P-adj < 0.001 and TR 1.09, CI 1.03-1.16, P-adj = 0.008, respectively]. Further, we present the novel finding that S. aureus colonization reduced the time to CMV acquisition (TR 0.21, CI 0.06-0.78, = 0.02). Together, these findings suggest that there is a relationship between timing of herpesvirus acquisition and early-life immune modulating exposures, which interestingly also includes the early infant gut microbiota.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 4, 93
Keyword [en]
healthy children, EBV, CMV, seroprevalence, risk factors, gut microbiota, S. aureus, Lactobacillus
National Category
Biological Sciences Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-134409DOI: 10.3389/fped.2016.00093ISI: 000382294800001PubMedID: 27630978OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-134409DiVA: diva2:1039566
Available from: 2016-10-24 Created: 2016-10-06 Last updated: 2016-10-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Johansson, Maria A.Persson, Jan-OlovSverremark-Ekström, Eva
By organisation
Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren InstituteDepartment of Mathematics
Biological SciencesPediatrics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 8 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link