Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Effects of biological age on the associations of blood pressure with cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality in old age: A population-based study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 6
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 220, 508-513 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/objectives: Whether chronological or biological age may play a role in the association between blood pressure and cause-specific mortality in old age is unclear. We seek to investigate the associations of blood pressure with all-cause, cardiovascular, and non-cardiovascular mortality among older people and to explore whether chronological age and biological age may modify the associations. Methods: This cohort study included 3014 participants (age >= 60 years, 64.0% women) fromthe Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, Stockholm. In 2001-2004, data were collected through interviews, clinical examinations, and inpatient register. Survival status and causes of deaths till 2011 for all participants were ascertained from Swedish death register. Data were analyzed with Cox proportional hazard models for all-cause mortality, and Fine-Gray competing risks models for cause-specific mortality. Results: During 23,788 person-years of follow-up (median per person, 8.4 years), 933 (31.0%) participants died. Systolic blood pressure < 130mmHg (vs. 130-139mmHg) was significantly associated with decreased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval = 0.40-0.87) and non-cardiovascular mortality (0.59, 0.36-0.98) in biologically young people (persons with neither cognitive impairment nor mobility limitation), but with increased all-cause mortality (1.63, 1.22-2.16) and non-cardiovascular mortality (2.18, 1.27-3.75) in biologically old people (persons with either cognitive impairment or mobility limitation). The hazard ratio of cardiovascular mortality was increased with increasing levels of systolic blood pressure (p(trend) = 0.009) and diastolic blood pressure (p(trend) = 0.008) in biologically young people. Conclusions: Biological age plays a pivotal role in the associations of blood pressure with cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality in old age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 220, 508-513 p.
Keyword [en]
Biological age, Blood pressure, Mortality, Cognitive impairment, Mobility limitation, Cohort study
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-135240DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.06.118ISI: 000381582000091PubMedID: 27390978OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-135240DiVA: diva2:1045094
Available from: 2016-11-08 Created: 2016-11-01 Last updated: 2016-11-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
In the same journal
International Journal of Cardiology
Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 6 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link