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Game‐based learning as a bedrock for creative learning
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
2016 (English)Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In a time when massive online courses are providing stereotypic learning content with auto-assessment the need to stimulate creative learning is stronger than ever. If all assignments are of the closed typed with solutions that fit auto-correction students will never use their creativity. The stimulating use of games and game-based learning in educational contexts has been widely discussed in research during the last decade. There are also studies indicating that excessive playing might be a passivating obstacle for students. The aim of this study is to describe and discuss how game-based learning might be used as a catalyst for creative learning with open ended project assignments with constructionism as the didactic idea. The research setup is a case study strategy consisting of three separate units. Each unit is a programming course where the author is the subject matter expert, course designer and the main teacher. Data has been collected in a combination of evaluation questionnaires, group discussions and analyses of games created by students in the three courses. Most ideas presented in this paper have also been discussed with teaching assistants and research colleagues. Findings indicate that open ended assignments where students design, implement and test digital games could kick-start creativity at the same time as students will increase their programming skills. However, the recommendation is not to go for open ended assignments only, but rather a mix with some introductory exercises where games, or other software solutions, are built with more strict and formal instructions. From a teachers’ perspective it is not necessary to build games in each and every course, what is important is rather to stimulate and encourage creativity in course assignments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Conferences Publishing, 2016.
Keyword [en]
Game-based learning, Creative learning, Game construction, Constructionism, Programming education
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-135422ISBN: 978‐1‐911218‐09‐8 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-135422DiVA: diva2:1045206
Conference
The 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning (ECGBL), Paisley, United Kingdom, 6th to 7th October 2016
Available from: 2016-11-08 Created: 2016-11-08 Last updated: 2016-11-18

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf