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Gaming habits, study habits and compulsive gaming among digital gaming natives
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
2016 (English)Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The so called "N-generation" or the "Digital natives" extensive use of computers and Internet resources have been widely discussed in research, but there are different opinions on how good their general computer skills are seen from a Computer science perspective. Considering digital gaming there seem to be stronger indications supporting the concept of a new generation with new habits. Most students in the group from where data has been collected for this study have gaming experiences from early pre-school childhood and will therefore in this paper be called "Digital gaming natives". Gaming has also been a considerable part of their later childhood and they are all enrolled for studies on computer game construction. The aim of this paper is to analyse and discuss digital native gamers’ gaming habits and how excessive gaming might have disturbed school studies or other social activities. Data has been collected from a course batch of 30 students following a university programme for Game construction at a department of Computer science. Out of the 28 students that wrote essays about their gaming habits 6 are female and 22 are male. A content analysis was conducted based on the student essays that were submitted and discussed online in a course on Games-based learning. Students’ experiences from gaming habits and study habits were also discussed at course seminars and have later been discussed with other teachers. Findings show that the Digital gaming natives’ gaming habits definitely are strong and that they in many situations have clashed with the informants’ study habits. In several cases parents have created gaming restrictions and there are examples of students’ self-restrictions, but there exist also examples of when excessive nightly gaming have interfered with the daily school work. Almost all students’ defend their gaming and claim that it has given them a richer life with nice experiences even if there are risks of addiction and displacement. One student wrote in his essay that: "Generally, gaming is a fantastic possibility to escape daily routines for a while to be immersed, to discover and to learn. At the same time this can lead to less pleasant states like compulsive gaming or addiction."

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Conferences Publishing, 2016.
Keyword [en]
Gaming habits, Study habits, Compulsive gaming, Digital gaming natives, Digital games
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-135424ISBN: 978‐1‐911218‐09‐8OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-135424DiVA: diva2:1045208
Conference
The 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning (ECGBL), Paisley, United Kingdom, 6th to 7th October 2016
Available from: 2016-11-08 Created: 2016-11-08 Last updated: 2016-11-17

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Mozelius, PeterWestin, ThomasWiklund, MatsNorberg, Lena
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