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Changes in Self-Representations Following Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy for Young Adults: A Comparative Typology
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Swedish Psychoanalytical Society, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, ISSN 0003-0651, E-ISSN 1941-2460, Vol. 64, no 5, 917-958 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Changes in dynamic psychological structures are often a treatment goal in psychotherapy. The present study aimed at creating a typology of self-representations among young women and men in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, to study longitudinal changes in self-representations, and to compare self-representations in the clinical sample with those of a nonclinical group. Twenty-five women and sixteen men were interviewed according to Blatt’s Object Relations Inventory pretreatment, at termination, and at a 1.5-year follow-up. In the comparison group, eleven women and nine men were interviewed at baseline, 1.5 years, and three years later. Typologies of the 123 self-descriptions in the clinical group and 60 in the nonclinical group were constructed by means of ideal-type analysis for men and women separately. Clusters of self-representations could be depicted on a two-dimensional matrix with the axes Relatedness-Self-definition and Integration-Nonintegration. In most cases, the self-descriptions changed over time in terms of belonging to different ideal-type clusters. In the clinical group, there was a movement toward increased integration in self-representations, but above all toward a better balance between relatedness and self-definition. The changes continued after termination, paralleled by reduced symptoms, improved functioning, and higher developmental levels of representations. No corresponding tendency could be observed in the nonclinical group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 64, no 5, 917-958 p.
Keyword [en]
self-representations, young adults, ideal-type analysis, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, long-term follow-up, maturational process
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-135640DOI: 10.1177/0003065116676765ISI: 000387745200003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-135640DiVA: diva2:1047262
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2016-12-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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More languages
Output format
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