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Combined effect of education and reproductive history on weight trajectories of young Australian women: A longitudinal study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
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2016 (English)In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 24, no 10, 2224-2231 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To investigate the combined effect of education and reproductive history on weight trajectory.

Methods

The association of education with weight trajectory (1996–2012) in relation to reproductive history was analyzed among 9,336 women (born 1973–1978) from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health using random effects models.

Results

Compared with women with a university degree/higher, lower-educated women were 2 kg heavier at baseline and gained an additional 0.24 kg/year. Giving birth was associated with an increase in weight which was more pronounced among women having their first birth <26 years of age (2.1 kg, 95% CI: 1.5–2.7), compared with 26 to 32 years or >32 years. While younger first-time mothers had a steeper weight trajectory (∼+0.16 kg/year, 95% CI: 0.1–0.3), this was less steep among lower-educated women. High-educated women with a second birth between 26 and 32 years had 0.9 kg decreased weight after this birth, while low-educated women gained 0.9 kg.

Conclusions

While the effect of having children on weight in young adulthood was minimal, women having their first birth <26 years of age had increased risk of weight gain, particularly primiparous women. Educational differences in weight persisted after accounting for reproductive history, suggesting a need to explore alternative mechanisms through which social differences in weight are generated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 24, no 10, 2224-2231 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137013DOI: 10.1002/oby.21610ISI: 000388276900033OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-137013DiVA: diva2:1058296
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2017-01-09Bibliographically approved

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Koupil, Ilona
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf