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Total sleep deprivation does not impact emotioncategorisation in dynamic stimuli
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
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2016 (English)In: Abstracts of the 23rd Congress of the European Sleep Research Society, 13–16 September 2016, Bologna, Italy. Journal of Sleep Research, 2016, Vol. 25(S1), 152-152 p., P193Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have highlighted a deficit in facial emotion recognition after sleep loss. However, while some studies suggest an overall deficit in ability, others have only found effects in individual emotions, or no effect at all. The aim of this study was to investigate this relationship in a large sample and to utilise a dynamic test of emotion recognition in multiple modalities. 145 individuals (91 female, ages 18–45) participated in a sleep-deprivation experiment. Participants were randomised into: one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) or normal sleep (8–9 h in bed). The following day participants completed a computerised emotional recognition test, consisting of 72 visual, audio, and audio-visual clips, representing 12 different emotions. The stimuli were divided into “easy” and “hard” depending on the intensity of emotional display. A mixed ANOVA revealed significant main effects of modality and difficulty, P < 0.001, but no main effect of condition, P = 0.31, on emotional recognition accuracy. Additionally, there was no interaction between condition and difficulty, P = 0.96, or modality, P = 0.67. This study indicates that sleep deprivation does not reduce the ability to recognise emotions. Given that some studies have only found effects on single emotions, it is possible that the effects of sleep loss are more specific than investigated here. However, it is also possible that previous findings relate to the types of static stimuli used. The ability to recognise emotions is key to social perception; this study suggests that this ability is resilient to one night of sleep deprivation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 25(S1), 152-152 p., P193
Keyword [en]
sleep deprivation, emotion categorisation, dynamic stimuli, facial emotion recognition
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137917DOI: 10.1111/jsr.12446OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-137917DiVA: diva2:1065084
Conference
23rd Congress of the European Sleep Research Society, 13–16 September 2016, Bologna, Italy
Available from: 2017-01-13 Created: 2017-01-13 Last updated: 2017-01-16

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CiteExportLink to record
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