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The Living Conditions of Children with Shared Residence – the Swedish Example
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
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2018 (English)In: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 861-883Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Among children with separated parents, shared residence–i.e., joint phys-ical custody where the child is sharing his or her time equally between two custodialparents’homes–is increasing in many Western countries and is particularly commonin Sweden. The overall level of living among children in Sweden is high; however, thepotential structural differences between children in various post-separation familyarrangements have not been sufficiently studied. Potential risks for children with sharedresidence relate to the daily hassles and stress when having two homes. This study aimsat investigating the living conditions of children with shared residence compared withchildren living with two custodial parents in the same household and those living withone custodial parent, respectively. Swedish national survey data collected from childrenaged 10–18 years (n≈5000) and their parents were used. The outcomes were groupedinto: Economic and material conditions, Social relations with parents and peers, Healthand health behaviors, Working conditions and safety in school and in the neighbor-hood, and Culture and leisure time activities. Results from a series of linear probabilitymodels showed that most outcomes were similar for children with shared residence andthose living with two custodial parents in the same household, while several outcomeswere worse for children living with one parent. However, few differences due to livingarrangements were found regarding school conditions. This study highlights the in-equalities in the living conditions of Swedish children, with those living with oneparent having fewer resources compared with other children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 11, no 3, p. 861-883
Keywords [en]
Divorce, Shared parenting, Child health, Family policy, Joint physical custody, Welfare
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138260DOI: 10.1007/s12187-017-9443-1ISI: 000431427200008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138260DiVA, id: diva2:1066475
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved

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Fransson, EmmaBrolin Låftman, SaraÖstberg, VivecaHjern, AndersBergström, Malin
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Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS)
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Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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