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Age differences in judgments of attractiveness, likeability, and trustworthiness of faces
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
2016 (English)In: Program of SANS 2016, 2016, 58-58 p., B-23Conference paper, Poster (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

People constantly evaluate faces to obtain social information. However, the link between aging and social evaluation of faces is not well understood. Todorov and colleagues introduced a data-driven model defined by valence and dominance as the two main components underlying social judgments of faces. They also created a stimulus set consisting of computer-generated faces which systematically vary along various social dimensions (e.g., Todorov et al., 2013, Emotion, 13, 724-38). We utilized a selection of these facial stimuli to investigate age-related differences in judgments of the following dimensions: attractiveness, competence, dominance, extraversion, likeability, threat, and trustworthiness. Participants rated how well the faces represented the intended social dimensions on 9-point scales ranging from not at all to extremely well. Results from 71 younger (YA; mean age = 23.42 years) and 60 older adults (OA; mean age = 69.19 years) showed that OA evaluated untrustworthy faces as more trustworthy, dislikeable faces as more likeable, and unattractive faces as more attractive compared to YA. OA also evaluated attractive faces as more attractive compared to YA, whereas YA did rate likeable and trustworthy faces as more likeable and trustworthy than did OA. In summary, our findings showed that OA evaluated negative social features less negatively compared to YA. This suggests that older and younger persons may use different cues for social evaluation of faces, and is in line with prior research suggesting age-related decline in the ability to recognize negative emotion expressions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. 58-58 p., B-23
Keyword [en]
age differences, attractiveness, likeability, trustworthiness, faces
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138372OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138372DiVA: diva2:1066996
Conference
Social & Affective Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, April 28-30, 2016, New York City, NY, USA
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2017-01-19

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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  • html
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