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Emotion and Aging: The impact of emotion on attention, memory, and face recognition in late adulthood
University of Queensland, Australia.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
2016 (English)In: Neuroimaging Personality, Social Cognition, and Character / [ed] John R Absher, Jasmin Cloutier, Academic Press, 2016, 259-278 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

It has been estimated that by 2050, 1.5 billion people will be aged 65 or older, representing 16 percent of the world’s population. Hence, gaining a more complete understanding of the psychological changes that occur with normal adult aging could provide valuable insights into long-term planning for health, work policies, and opportunities for engaging and collaborating with older adults. Although aging is associated with cognitive deficits, and these are associated with some functional costs, this does not provide a complete picture of the psychological changes that occur with aging. In particular, increasing evidence from the emotional aging literature offers a different perspective on how we age. Recent discoveries in functional neuroimaging also provide important insights into how the brain functions during various cognitive and emotional tasks as we age, granting a more comprehensive view of the aging brain. The primary focus of this chapter is to provide an overview of multidisciplinary evidence from both behavioral and neuroimaging studies in the emotional aging literature. The chapter is organized based on the impact of age-related changes in emotional processing on three main categories of cognitive function: attention, memory, and face recognition.Before discussing the main findings from each of these three categories, some of the major discoveries and dominant models in the cognitive aging domain will be discussed briefly. Throughout this chapter, several questions are addressed: what are the underlying cognitive and neural mechanisms of the attentional biases toward positive items in aging? Do older adults have difficulties in processing negative emotions or do they process positive emotions differently than younger adults? What factors influence the processing of emotional facial expressions in late adulthood? Do the temporal features of stimuli help older adults overcome difficulties in recognizing emotions? Are there any age differences in processing the six main emotions expressed by the face?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2016. 259-278 p.
Keyword [en]
attentional bias, cognitive aging, emotion recognition, emotional memory, positivity effect
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138405DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-800935-2.00013-0ISBN: 9780128009352 (print)ISBN: 9780128011669 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138405DiVA: diva2:1067131
Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2017-02-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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