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Family language policy in Sweden, Cyprus and Estonia: A comparison of efforts and choices among Russian-speaking families
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Slavic Languages.
2016 (English)In: Bilingual Child Migrants in a Multilingual Europe: Book of Abstracts, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Drawing on theories offamily language policy (FLP), our study investigates Russian-language maintenance and transmission, and the social and cultural identities of Russian-speaking informants in the multilingual settings of Sweden, Cyprus and Estonia. We investigate the home languages of the members of these communities, and whether Russian as an L1 is maintained and transferred to the second generation. Family language policy in multilingual, transcultural families, parental expectations and strategies to construct safe spaces of language transmission, challenges and support through such institutions as kindergartens and schools, agents of normalization (Purkarthofer and Muni Toke, 2016; Busch, 2012; 2016), language and social spaces, as well as manifold linguistic repertoires of heteroglossic acquisition for multilingual competence and practices are under investigation (Tuan, 1977; Lefebvre, 1991; Giroux, 1992; Massey, 2005; Canagarajah, 2013). Using parental written questionnaires with the focus on general background, socio-economic status and language proficiency (Otwinowska & Karpava, 2015), as well as oral semi-structured interviews (Ringblom, Zabrodskaja, Karpava 2015), our study attempts to describe how FLP is managed through literacy activities in 53 multilingual families in three different cultural and linguistic environments. Our results show both differences and similarities among Russian-speakers in the three countries, not only in their family language practices, but also in their attitudes towards Russian-language literacy. Multilingualism and the maintenance of the Russian language and culture are usually encouraged and parents often choose the OPOL approach at home. However, not all of the efforts result in successful home language transmission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138497OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138497DiVA: diva2:1067504
Conference
Bilingual Child Migrants in a Multilingual Europe, Warsaw, Poland, November 16, 2016
Funder
Åke Wiberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-01-21 Created: 2017-01-21 Last updated: 2017-06-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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