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Intergenerational Transmission of Trajectories of Offending over Three Generations
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology, ISSN 2199-4641, Vol. 2, no 4, 417-441 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Crime runs in families: a convicted parent is a risk factor for children’s criminality. What is the extent of intergenerational transmission in Sweden? Is transmission similar for men and women and/or do we see gender-specific transmission? To what extent do children follow similar offending trajectories as their parents?

Methods

We used group-based trajectory modelling to study intergenerational transmission in the Stockholm Life Course Project. By merging the samples when running the trajectory models, we get a more robust model than if we had run the samples separately.

Results

Children of convicted parents are about 2–2.6 times more likely to have a conviction compared with children of non-convicted parents. We did not find strong support that intergenerational transmission is stronger for same-gender relationships. Transmission seems slightly stronger to daughters and from mothers, but few of these patterns are significant. Although father and offspring trajectories look similar, the significant relationship can be explained by the observation that non-offending fathers are more likely to have non-offending sons. Fathers with more chronic offending trajectories do not necessarily predict sons with similar more chronic offending trajectories.

Conclusions

We find strong intergenerational transmission of criminal behaviour, but offspring convictions are related to the fact that fathers have a conviction rather than to what their conviction trajectory looks like.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 2, no 4, 417-441 p.
Keyword [en]
Intergenerational transmission, Trajectories, Offending, Sweden
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138607DOI: 10.1007/s40865-016-0037-2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138607DiVA: diva2:1067860
Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2017-04-05Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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Output format
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