Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Tropical seaweed beds are important habitats for mobile invertebrate epifauna
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 6
2016 (English)In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 183, 1-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine macrophyte habitats in temperate regions provide productive habitats for numerous organisms, with their abundant and diverse invertebrate epifaunal assemblages constituting important linkages between benthic primary production and higher trophic levels. While it is commonly also recognized that certain vegetated habitats in the tropics, such as seagrass meadows, can harbour diverse epifaunal assemblages and may constitute important feeding grounds to fish, little is known about the epifaunal assemblages associated with tropical seaweed beds. We investigated the abundance, biomass and taxon richness of the mobile epifaunal community (>= 1 mm) of tropical East African seaweed beds, as well as the abundance of invertivorous fishes, and compared it with that of closely situated seagrass meadows, to establish the ecological role of seaweed beds as habitat for epifauna as well as potential feeding grounds for fish. The results showed that seaweed beds had a higher abundance of mobile epifauna (mean SD: 10,600 +/- 6000 vs 3700 +/- 2800 per m(2)) than seagrass meadows, as well as a higher invertebrate biomass (35.9 +/- 46.8 vs 1.9 +/- 2.1 g per m(2)) and taxon richness (32.7 +/- 11.8 vs 19.1 +/- 6.3 taxa per sample), despite having a lower macrophyte biomass. Additionally, the high abundance of invertivorous fishes found in seaweed beds indicates that they act as important feeding grounds to several fish species in the region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 183, 1-12 p.
Keyword [en]
Tropical, Seaweed, Mobile epifauna, Diversity, Macroalgae, Seagrass
National Category
Biological Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Fish and Aquacultural Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-139391DOI: 10.1016/j.ecss.2016.10.010ISI: 000390726900001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-139391DiVA: diva2:1072143
Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2017-02-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tano, StinaEggertsen, MariaWikström, Sofia A.Berkström, CharlotteHailing, Christina
By organisation
Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant SciencesStockholm University Baltic Sea Centre
In the same journal
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Biological SciencesEarth and Related Environmental SciencesFish and Aquacultural Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 90 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf