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Short-chain chlorinated paraffins in soil, paddy seeds (Oryza sativa) and snails (Ampullariidae) in an e-waste dismantling area in China: Homologue group pattern, spatial distribution and risk assessment
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
Number of Authors: 4
2017 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 220, 608-615 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in multi-environmental matrices are studied in Taizhou, Zhejiang Province, China, which is a notorious e-waste dismantling area. The investigated matrices consist of paddy field soil, paddy seeds (Oryza sativa, separated into hulls and rice unpolished) and apple snails (Ampullariidae, inhabiting the paddy fields). The sampling area covered a 65-km radius around the contamination center. C-10 and C-11 are the two predominant homologue groups in the area, accounting for about 35.7% and 33.0% of total SCCPs, respectively. SCCPs in snails and hulls are generally higher than in soil samples (30.4-530 ng/g dw), and SCCPs in hulls are approximate five times higher than in corresponding rice samples (4.90-55.1 ng/g dw). Homologue pattern analysis indicates that paddy seeds (both hull and rice) tend to accumulate relatively high volatile SCCP homologues, especially the ones with shorter carbon chain length, while snails tend to accumulate relatively high lipophilic homologues, especially the ones with more substituted chlorines. SCCPs in both paddy seeds and snails are linearly related to those in the soil. The e-waste dismantling area, which covers a radius of approximate 20 km, shows higher pollution levels for SCCPs according to their spatial distribution in four matrices. The preliminary assessment indicates that SCCP levels in local soils pose no significant ecological risk for soil dwelling organisms, but higher risks from dietary exposure of SCCPs are suspected for people living in e-waste dismantling area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 220, 608-615 p.
Keyword [en]
Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs), E-waste dismantling area, Environmental-matrix distribution, Spatial distribution, Dietary exposure
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-139375DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2016.10.009ISI: 000390736700066PubMedID: 27751635OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-139375DiVA: diva2:1072385
Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2017-02-07Bibliographically approved

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