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Childcare and eldercare policies in Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
2016 (English)In: The sandwich generation: caring for onself and others at home and at work / [ed] Ronald J. Burke, Lisa M. Calvano, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, 242-261 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Having both children and aged parents with care needs while being in paid work is probably more frequent, but less problematic, in Sweden compared to most other welfare states. Although the average Swedish woman has almost two children during her lifetime and it is very common in mid-life to care for aged parents, women remain in paid work due to highly accessible publicly financed child- and eldercare services.

The main focus in Scandinavian child- and eldercare policy is to make the individual’s welfare less dependent upon their possibilities to purchase care services at the market and to receive care from the family; ambitions described by the two concepts universalism and de-familization. This chapter examines the meaning of economic and social de-familization (economic and social autonomy) in two types of care relationships – parental childcare and filial care – as well as from two perspectives: the perspective of the person in need of care and the potential or actual caregiver.

Care services, as well as payments for care and care leave, have increased for childcare and decreased for eldercare in Sweden during the last three decades. While the development of childcare services stands out as a success story resulting in nearly universal access, Sweden has transformed its formerly universalistic eldercare system into a more selective and familialistic one. The decline in eldercare services is contrary to law, national policy and the care preferences of older persons. Their right to autonomy and self-determination has been drastically curtailed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016. 242-261 p.
Series
New horizons in management
Keyword [en]
childcare, eldercare, social policy, universalism, de-familization, Swedish welfare state
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-134831ISBN: 978 1 78536 495 2 (print)ISBN: 978 1 78536 496 9 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-134831DiVA: diva2:1072667
Projects
Forskningsprogrammet "Individanpassad omsorg och generell välfärd" (Forte)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-02-08 Created: 2016-10-20 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf