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Benchmarking the environmental performance of best management practice and genetic improvements in Egyptian aquaculture using life cycle assessment
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. WorldFish, Batu Maung, Penang, Malaysia.
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Number of Authors: 5
2017 (English)In: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 468, 53-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Egyptian aquaculture is gaining importance as an affordable and nutritious source of animal protein among Egyptians. Nile tilapia dominates production (77% of total production), followed by carps (17%) and mullets (11%). Egyptian tilapia farmers are, however, facing challenges with regards to financial viability and poor water quality. Fish farms are also contributing towards water pollution and other environmental impacts. In order to improve the situation, WorldFish launched the IEIDEAS project in 2011 with the ambition to train farmers in best management practices (BMP) and distribute the 9th generation of the Abbassa strain (G9). The present study aimed at evaluating any relative environmental gains that BMP and G9 offers compared to conventional farming using life cycle assessment (LCA). Inventory data representing 137 farmers and four groups (control, BMP, G9 and BMP + G9) were evaluated. Life cycle impact assessment results including quantitative uncertainties were then calculated and statistically tested, using Monte Carlo analysis and Wilcoxon paired significance test. Five impact categories were explored: global warming, eutrophication, acidification, freshwater consumption and land use. The G9 stain offered the greatest improvements across the evaluated impact categories, significantly reducing environmental impacts with between 12% and 36%. BMP, in the meantime, only offered significant improvements compared to the control with regards to eutrophication, acidification, freshwater consumption and land use. Meanwhile, BMP + G9 performed comparably to only G9 except for eutrophication where it had a significantly larger environmental footprint. More efficient feed utilization and higher productivity were the main reasons for the environmental improvements. Additional improvements that should be explored include improved feeds made of sustainably sourced raw materials, and better pond water management, including probiotics and paddle-wheels.

Statement of relevance: BMP and improved stains help reduce environmental impacts

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 468, 53-59 p.
Keyword [en]
LCA, Tilapia, Egypt, BMP, Environment, Footprint
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries Biological Sciences Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-139358DOI: 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2016.09.051ISI: 000390735200008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-139358DiVA: diva2:1072755
Available from: 2017-02-08 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2017-02-08Bibliographically approved

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Henriksson, Patrik J. G.
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