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Highly recruited brown adipose tissue does not in itself protect against obesity
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Keyword [en]
Brown adipose tissue, UCP1, uncoupling protein 1, UCP!-ablated, mice, cold-recruited, thermoneutrality, high-fat diet, body fat
National Category
Biological Sciences Physiology
Research subject
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-140444OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-140444DiVA: diva2:1079295
Available from: 2017-03-08 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2017-03-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Energy flow and metabolic efficiency attributed to brown adipose tissue
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy flow and metabolic efficiency attributed to brown adipose tissue
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The large capacity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to expend energy as heat makes it an interesting potential player in weight regulation and other metabolic conditions. This is of particular interest as it has been recognized that adult humans possess BAT. The protein responsible for the heat production is uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which, as the name implies, uncouples the respiratory chain from ATP production; instead heat is produced. Cold is the strongest recruiter and activator of BAT. However, also obesogenic food has a low but nonetheless significant effect on the recruitment and activation of UCP1, although the significance of this has been discussed.

In the present thesis, I have studied the effect of diet on BAT and the possibilities for it to be obesity-protective. This can be done by comparing responses in wild-type mice and in UCP1-ablated mice. Since the effect of diet on BAT is low, it is of importance to control the temperature and maintain thermoneutrality. Other confounding factors to keep in mind are differences in actual energy and composition of food and also cohort differences. When controlling all the parameters mentioned and giving the mice the same obesogenic diet, the mice possessing UCP1 compared to UCP1-ablated mice had higher energy expenditure, and lower weight gain, despite eating more. This confirms the presence of a UCP1-dependent diet-induced thermogenesis. Thus, the conclusion must be that possessing UCP1 does result in obesity protection at thermoneutrality. However, the relevance for human energy balance is still not established.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, 2017. 86 p.
Keyword
Brown adipose tissue, BAT, UCP1, diet-induced thermogenesis, DIT, obesity, high-fat diet, energy expenditure
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-140190 (URN)978-91-7649-734-0 (ISBN)978-91-7649-735-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-04-07, Vivi Täckholmsalen (Q-salen), NPQ-huset, Svante Arrhenius väg 20, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
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Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 1: Manuscript. Paper 2: Manuscript. Paper 3: Manuscript.

Available from: 2017-03-15 Created: 2017-03-07 Last updated: 2017-03-10Bibliographically approved

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