Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A bulletin board of dreams: corporate empowerment promotion and feminist implications
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
Number of Authors: 1
2016 (English)In: International feminist journal of politics, ISSN 1461-6742, E-ISSN 1468-4470, Vol. 18, no 4, 528-543 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the premises of corporate solutions to gender inequality in the Global South. In feminist debates, businesses' increasing emphasis on women's empowerment has been discussed both in terms of increasing feminist impact and the co-optation of feminist demands. To explore the ideological effects of corporate gender practices, focus is placed on the Coca-Cola Company's global 5by20 campaign, which has the stated aim to empower five million women as small-scale entrepreneurs around the world and, in a win-win fashion, to double sales by 2020. Based on interviews and participatory observations in Mexico, this article traces a particular narrative of empowerment, envisioned as a transition from dependency to self-sufficiency and threatened by psychological and cultural restraints rather than material conditions. It shows that self-help and positive thinking are essential affective drives, thus reinforcing market-based, individualized development strategies. In response to feminist debates, the article concludes that corporate gender practices can be seen as part of a neoliberal transposition of equality concerns from a political to an economic domain. In effect, when initiatives such as 5by20 promote the accumulation of human capital to enhance gender equality, they simultaneously work to legitimize the inequalities that are necessarily entailed in competitive capitalism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 18, no 4, 528-543 p.
Keyword [en]
Women's empowerment, transnational corporations, entrepreneurship, emotional capitalism, Mexico
National Category
Political Science Sociology Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-140458DOI: 10.1080/14616742.2016.1190214ISI: 000392626100003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-140458DiVA: diva2:1079520
Available from: 2017-03-08 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2017-03-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tornhill, Sofie
By organisation
Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies
In the same journal
International feminist journal of politics
Political ScienceSociologyGender Studies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 2 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf