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A twin study of work-home interference and the risk of future sickness absence with mental diagnoses
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, 26, S1, Oxford University Press, 2016, Vol. 26 (suppl_1), ckw164.083Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

Work-home interference has been proposed as an important explanation for sickness absence (SA). Previous studies show mixed results, and have not accounted for genetics and shared everyday environment (familial factors), or investigated diagnosis specific SA. The aim was to study if work-home interference predicts SA due to stress-related mental diagnoses, or SA due to other mental diagnoses, among women and men, when adjusting for various confounders and familial factors.

Methods

This prospective cohort study included 11,916 twins, 19-47 years (49% women).

Data on work-to-home and home-to-work conflicts and relevant confounders were derived from a 2005 survey, and national register data on SA spells until 2013 were obtained. Odds Ratios (ORs) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) were calculated. Discordant twin pair design was applied to adjust for familial factors.

Results

For women, each one unit increase in work-to-home and home-to-work conflicts was associated with SA due to stress-related mental diagnoses and to SA due to other mental diagnoses, when adjusting for sociodemographic factors (ORs 1.15-1.31). With further adjustments for work, health-related or familial factors, none of the associations remained. For men, each one unit increase in work-to-home conflicts was associated with SA due to stress-related diagnoses (ORs 1.23-1.35), independently of confounders.

Conclusions

Work-to-home conflict was independently associated with future SA due to stress-related diagnoses among men only. Health and familial factors are important confounders to consider when researching work-home interference and SA, especially among women. Not including such confounders involves risking drawing incorrect conclusions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016. Vol. 26 (suppl_1), ckw164.083
Keyword [en]
work-home interference, sickness absence, unequal opportunities
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-140522DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw164.083OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-140522DiVA: diva2:1080326
Conference
9th European Public Health Conference All for Health, Health for All Vienna, Austria 9–12 November 2016
Note

Financial support came from AFA Insurance.

Available from: 2017-03-09 Created: 2017-03-09 Last updated: 2017-03-09

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf