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Job strain and binge eating among Brazilian workers participating in the ELSA-Brasil study: does BMI matter?
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 59, no 3, 247-255 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To assess the association between job strain and binge eating as well as the effect-modifying influence of body mass index (BMI) on this association. Methods: A total of 11,951 active civil servants from the multicenter Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) was included in this cross-sectional analysis. Job strain was assessed using the Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire. Binge eating was defined as eating a large amount of food with a sense of lack of control over what and how much is eaten in less than 2 hours at least twice a week. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between binge eating and job strain as well as its interaction with BMI. Results: After adjustment, and using low-strain job as the reference category, binge eating was associated with high-strain job (high demand/low control: odds ratio [OR]=1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26-1.98), active job (high demand/high control: OR=1.35, 95% CI 1.07-1.70), and passive job (low demand/low control: OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.01-1.53). Psychological job demands were positively associated with binge eating (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07), while greater job control and social support at work were each inversely associated with binge eating (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.97 and OR=0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98, respectively). BMI modified the association between job strain and binge eating: Heavier psychological job demands were associated with higher odds of binge eating among obese participants, while a stronger inverse association between job control and binge eating was seen among slimmer participants. Conclusions: Job strain increases the odds of binge eating and this association is modified by BMI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 59, no 3, 247-255 p.
Keyword [en]
Feeding and eating disorders, Obesity, Psychological stress, Work
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-140804DOI: 10.1539/joh.16-0157-OAISI: 000402452500005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-140804DiVA: diva2:1082602
Available from: 2017-03-17 Created: 2017-03-17 Last updated: 2017-06-27Bibliographically approved

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Toivanen, Susanna
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Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS)
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
Language
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More languages
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