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Effect of the Interplay Between Genetic and Behavioral Risks on Survival After Age 75
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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Number of Authors: 8
2016 (English)In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 64, no 12, 2440-2447 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To explore the association between genes that may be related to human mortality, taking into account the possible contribution of morbidity, and investigate whether lifestyle behaviors may attenuate genetic risk. DESIGN: Twenty-five-year population-based cohort study. SETTING: Kungsholmen cohort, Stockholm, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals aged 75 and older (N = 1,229). MEASUREMENTS: The associations between single-nucleotide variations in 14 genes (previously associated with mortality or to diseases linked to mortality), relevant lifestyle risk behaviors (smoking; mental, physical, or social inactivity; moderate or poor social network), and mortality were estimated using Cox regression. RESULTS: People with allelic variation in four genes related to cardiovascular diseases and metabolism were more likely to die: apolipoprotein (APO) C1 GG and AG carriers, APOE epsilon 4 carriers, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) TC carriers, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3KCB) GG carriers. Individuals with multiple adverse alleles had 62% higher mortality rate than those with none. In contrast, people with no risk behaviors (low-risk profile) had 65% lower mortality rate than people with all examined risk behaviors (high-risk profile). Combining the genetic and environmental factors, it was found that, independent of genetic profile, individuals with a low-risk profile had up to 64% lower mortality rate than those with a moderate high-or high-risk profile and at least one genetic risk factor. CONCLUSION: This study supports and expands evidence that genetic variations in APOE, IDE, and PI3KCB are associated with lower mortality rate, although lifestyle behaviors can modulate their effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 64, no 12, 2440-2447 p.
Keyword [en]
genes, lifestyle behaviors, survival, mortality, population-based cohort study
National Category
Geriatrics Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-141497DOI: 10.1111/jgs.14391ISI: 000393589200021PubMedID: 27806189OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-141497DiVA: diva2:1087476
Available from: 2017-04-07 Created: 2017-04-07 Last updated: 2017-04-10Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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