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Bioconcentration and Biotransformation of Amitriptyline in Gilt-Head Bream
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
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Number of Authors: 8
2017 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 51, no 4, 2464-2471 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extensive global use of the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor Amitriptyline (AMI) for treatment of mental health problems has led to its common occurrence in the aquatic environment. To assess AMI bioconcentration factors, tissue distribution, and metabolite formation in fish, we exposed gilt-head bream (Sparus aurata) to AMI in seawater for 7 days at two concentrations (0.2 mu g/L and 10 mu g/L). Day 7 proportional bioconcentration factors (BCFs) ranged from 6 (10 mu g/L dose, muscle) to 127 (0.2 mu g/L dose, brain) and were consistently larger at the low dose level. The relative tissue distribution of AMI was consistent at both doses, with concentrations decreasing in the order brain approximate to gill > liver > plasma > bile >> muscle. Using a suspect screening workflow based on liquid chromatography-high resolution (Orbitrap) mass spectrometry we identified 33 AMI metabolites (both Phase I and Phase II), occurring mostly in bile, liver and plasma. Ten structures are reported for the first time. Remarkably, all 33 metabolites retained the tricyclic ring structure common to tricyclic antidepressants, which may be toxicologically relevant. Collectively these data indicate that, in addition to AMI, a broad suite of metabolites should be included in biomonitoring campaigns in order to fully characterize exposure in aquatic wildlife.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 51, no 4, 2464-2471 p.
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Environmental Engineering Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-141405DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b05831ISI: 000394724300064PubMedID: 28106990OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-141405DiVA: diva2:1090028
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved

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Plassmann, Merle M.Benskin, Jonathan P.
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