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Can the use of deactivated glass fibre filters eliminate sorption artefacts associated with active air sampling of perfluorooctanoic acid?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
2017 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 224, 779-786 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experimental work was undertaken to test whether gaseous perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) sorbs to glassfibre filters (GFFs) during air sampling, causing an incorrect measure of the gas-particle equilibriumdistribution. Furthermore, tests were performed to investigate whether deactivation by siliconisationprevents sorption of gaseous PFOA to filter materials. An apparatus was constructed to closely simulate ahigh-volume air sampler, although with additional features allowing introduction of gaseous test compoundsinto an air stream stripped from particles. The set-up enabled investigation of the sorption ofgaseous test compounds to filter media, eliminating any contribution from particles. Experiments wereperformed under ambient outdoor air conditions at environmentally relevant analyte concentrations.The results demonstrate that gaseous PFOA sorbs to GFFs, but that breakthrough of gaseous PFOA on theGFFs occurs at trace-level loadings. This indicates that during high volume air sampling, filters do notquantitatively capture all the PFOA in the sampled air. Experiments with siliconised GFFs showed thatthis filter pre-treatment reduced the sorption of gaseous PFOA, but that sorption still occurred atenvironmentally relevant air concentrations. We conclude that deactivation of GFFs does not allow forthe separation of gaseous and particle bound perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) during active airsampling. Consequently, the well-recognised theory that PFCAs do not prevail as gaseous species in theatmosphere may be based on biased measurements. Caution should be taken to ensure that this artefactwill not bias the conclusions of future field studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 224, 779-786 p.
Keyword [en]
Air sampling, Sorption, PFOA, Siliconisation, Silylation
National Category
Environmental Sciences Analytical Chemistry
Research subject
Applied Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142097DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.020ISI: 000399261400081OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-142097DiVA: diva2:1090880
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1345
Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2017-05-29Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Sources, transport and fate of perfluoroalkyl acids in the atmosphere
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sources, transport and fate of perfluoroalkyl acids in the atmosphere
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are man-made chemicals which have been observed in the global environment, even in locations far away from where they are emitted. These persistent substances are taken up in humans and biota and may have toxic effects. Knowledge about how PFAAs are dispersed in the environment is needed to discern strategies to manage their sources and to evaluate the efficacy of adopted legislation. This thesis aimed to increase our understanding of the sources of PFAAs to the atmosphere and how PFAAs are transported in air. The results of Paper I demonstrated that gaseous perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) sorbs to typical glass fibre filters (GFFs) used in high-volume air sampling of PFAAs. As a consequence, the fraction of gaseous PFOA present in sampled air is underestimated, while the fraction of PFOA associated with aerosols is overestimated. Replacing GFFs with filters deactivated through silanisation and siliconisation did not eliminate this sampling artefact and is therefore not recommended as a means to determine the gas-particle partitioning of PFAAs. In Paper II, monitoring of the mass of PFOA transferred from water solutions of pH 0.2-5.5 demonstrated that the acid dissociation constant of linear PFOA and the four most ubiquitous branched PFOA isomers is around or below 1. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the presence of counter ions and organic matter in water retarded, rather than enhanced, the volatilisation of PFOA. Therefore, volatilisation of all isomers of PFOA from environmental waters is expected to be negligible. To further study the transfer of PFAAs from environmental waters to air, Paper III simulated the process of sea spray generation in the laboratory. Strong enrichment of PFAAs was observed from bulk water to the surface microlayer and to aerosols. The enrichment increased with PFAA chain length, indicating that this process is of greater importance for more surface active substances. The highest enrichment was observed in aerosols < 1.6 µm, which can travel over long distances if not rained out. Based on the measured aerosol enrichment factors we estimated that approximately 70 metric tonnes of PFAAs are aerosolised from the global oceans yearly and that 3% of this mass is deposited in terrestrial environments. Paper IV reported the occurrence of branched PFOA isomers in deposition sampled in five geographical locations. The presence of these isomers demonstrated that atmospheric transformation of fluorotelomer alcohols is not the only ongoing source of PFAAs to air. We hypothesised that, additionally, both sea spray aerosols and direct emissions from manufacturing sources contributed to the contamination of the precipitation on different spatial scales. Although further research is required to determine the relative importance of different sources to the atmosphere locally and globally, this thesis has substantially advanced the state-of-the-science by i) demonstrating the significance of an air sampling artefact discussed as an uncertainty in the scientific literature over the past decade, ii) definitively ruling out volatilisation from environmental waters as a source of PFOA to air, iii) demonstrating transfer of PFAAs from seawater to air via sea spray aerosols and thus quantifying the environmental importance of this process, and iv) ultimately demonstrating that several types of sources of PFAAs impact the global atmosphere and thus PFAA contamination patterns in precipitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 2017
Keyword
Perfluorinated alkyl acids, PFOS, PFOA, Isomers, Sources, Atmospheric transport, Sea spray, Gas-particle partitioning, Volatilisation
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142116 (URN)978-91-7649-700-5 (ISBN)978-91-7649-701-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-06-09, William-Olssonsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 14, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1345
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2017-05-18Bibliographically approved

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