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Detection of the Atmosphere of the 1.6 M-circle plus Exoplanet GJ 1132 b
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Number of Authors: 6
2017 (English)In: Astronomical Journal, ISSN 0004-6256, E-ISSN 1538-3881, Vol. 153, no 4, 191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Detecting the atmospheres of low-mass, low-temperature exoplanets is a high-priority goal on the path to ultimately detecting biosignatures in the atmospheres of habitable exoplanets. High-precision HST observations of several super-Earths with equilibrium temperatures below 1000 K have to date all resulted in featureless transmission spectra, which have been suggested to be due to high-altitude clouds. We report the detection of an atmospheric feature in the atmosphere of a 1.6 M-circle plus transiting exoplanet, GJ 1132 b, with an equilibrium temperature of similar to 600 K and orbiting a nearby M dwarf. We present observations of nine transits of the planet obtained simultaneously in the griz and JHK passbands. We find an average radius of 1.43 +/- 0.16 R-circle plus for the planet, averaged over all the passbands, and a radius of 0.255 +/- 0.023 R-circle dot for the star, both of which are significantly greater than previously found. The planet radius can be decomposed into a surface radius at similar to 1.375 R-circle plus overlaid by atmospheric features that increase the observed radius in the z and K bands. The z-band radius is 4 sigma higher than the continuum, suggesting a strong detection of an atmosphere. We deploy a suite of tests to verify the reliability of the transmission spectrum, which are greatly helped by the existence of repeat observations. The large z-band transit depth indicates strong opacity from H2O and/or CH4 or a hitherto-unconsidered opacity. A surface radius of 1.375 +/- 0.16 R-circle plus allows for a wide range of interior compositions ranging from a nearly Earth-like rocky interior, with similar to 70% silicate and similar to 30% Fe, to a substantially H2O-rich water world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 153, no 4, 191
Keyword [en]
planetary systems, stars: fundamental parameters, stars: individual
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142387DOI: 10.3847/1538-3881/aa6477ISI: 000398288200002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-142387DiVA: diva2:1092970
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved

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Ciceri, Simona
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  • apa
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