Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
High-Performance Magnetic Activated Carbon from Solid Waste from Lignin Conversion Processes. 1. Their Use As Adsorbents for CO2
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 7
2017 (English)In: acs sustainable chemistry and engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 5, no 4, 3087-3095 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lignin is naturally abundant and a renewable [GRAPHICS] precursor with the potential to be used in the production of both chemicals and materials. As many lignin conversion processes suffer from a significant production of solid wastes in the form of hydrochars, this study focused on transforming hydrochars into magnetic activated carbons (MAC). The hydrochars were produced via hydrothermal treatment of lignins together with formic acid. The activation of the hydrochars was performed chemically with KOH with a focus on the optimization of the MACs as adsorbents for CO2. MACs are potentially relevant to carbon capture and storage (CCS) and gas purification processes. In general, the MACs had high specific surface areas (up to 2875 m(2)/g), high specific pore volumes, and CO2 adsorption capacities of up to 6.0 mmol/g (I atm, 0 degrees C). The textual properties of the MACs depended on the temperature of the activation. MACs activated at a temperature of 700 degrees C had very high ultramicropore volumes, which are relevant for potential adsorption-driven separation of CO2 from N-2. Activation at 800 degrees C led to MACs with larger pores and very high specific surface areas. This temperature-dependent optimization option, combined with the magnetic properties, provided numerous potential applications of the MACs besides those of CCS. The hydrochar was derived from eucalyptus lignin, and the corresponding MACs displayed soft magnetic behavior with coercivities of <100 Oe and saturation magnetization values of 1-10 emu/g.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 5, no 4, 3087-3095 p.
Keyword [en]
CCS, Magnetic activated carbon, Lignin conversion, Hydrochar, Separation, Adsorption, Desorption, GREEN & SUSTAINABLE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
National Category
Chemical Sciences Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142383DOI: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.6602795ISI: 000398429700034OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-142383DiVA: diva2:1092989
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Björnerbäck, FredrikTrushkina, YuliaSalazar-Alvarez, GermanHedin, Niklas
By organisation
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK)
Chemical SciencesChemical Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 68 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf