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Consequences of brown bear viewing tourism: A review
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Oviedo University, Spain; University of Pretoria, South Africa.
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Number of Authors: 9
2017 (English)In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 206, 169-180 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many countries promote wildlife observation as part of ecotourism offerings. The brown bear Ursus arctos is among the most targeted species for ecotourism in Notth America and Europe, making it an ideal candidate to examine the consequences of wildlife viewing upon the species. As bear viewing often occurs in sensitive places where bears congregate for mating, rearing young and/or feeding, it is important to evaluate potential positive and negative effects of different viewing practices. Here we reviewed available information on bear viewing practices and their effects on bears, people and ecosystems. Behavioural, physiological and ecological aspects related to bears are reviewed from three different perspectives: ecotourism consequences for bears, direct bear-human interactions and social impacts of bear ecotourism. Because bear viewing can have positive and negative impacts on both bear populations and bear-human interactions, it is important to carefully evaluate every practice associated with bear viewing at a local scale. Because bear populations around the world have diverse population statuses and different management regimes, successful procedures and rules effective in one place do not guarantee that they will be adequate elsewhere. Effective management of bear viewing practices requires a better understanding of the consequences for bears, the mechanisms behind observed bear reactions to humans, and the results of bear habituation. Because inappropriate beat viewing practices can lead to processes such as food conditioning and habituation, which can have serious consequences for both people and bears, regulations on bear ecotourism are urgently needed to minimize unintended consequences of bear viewing practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 206, 169-180 p.
Keyword [en]
Ursus arctos, Feeding site, Grizzly bear, Management, Viewing site, Habituation, Food-conditioning, Ecotourism
National Category
Biological Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142530DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2016.12.035ISI: 000394065900021OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-142530DiVA: diva2:1093951
Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2017-05-08Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf